Tag Archives: Depression

Can’t Concentrate Enough to Meditate

I generally don’t do well with meditation.  I’ve had my problems with medication.

Wow, that sounds like a song.   Don’t steal it, okay? . . .  but I digress . . .

I just can’t seem to quiet my mind.  It’s an ongoing problem.  I’m better at researching issues and attempting suggested solutions from a list.  Those have been my biggest breakthroughs in dealing with my crap.    But lately I’ve been feeling almost new-age-like — until the books talk about meditation, intoning aspirations and such.   I believe it does work for some people but I  have trouble.  I know it takes practice.   The books say so.

It reminds me of the time my sister was  on a girl scout  camping trip.  All of the girls were looking into the  night sky at the stars and trying to identify the constellations.  My sister and her friend were not impressed and a little bored.  They realized that since everyone was focused and looking up to the sky they could just walk away  —  unnoticed.  And they did.

That’s what my mind does.   It just walks away.   I almost actually walked away at a group therapy meditation session, but the therapist gave me a dirty look.   I just closed my eyes. Whatever.

Anywho . . .

What was I talking about?

Oh yeah, meditation.

I’ve tried it and fallen asleep, I’ve tried it and gotten very angry that THESE PEOPLE ARE MAKING ME SIT HERE!!!!  And, truth be told, I haven’t tried it very diligently.    I did try  massage once.   I could not relax.   Waste of money.

So it’s really weird that I’m walking around with my Feng Shui books and compass looking for my creativity and wealth corner.

Whatever.

Just Me With . . . random thoughts.

I’m tempted to preempt the trolls who will tell me to shut the f**k up and stop whining and go out and do something productive.   Tell ya what, I’ll meditate on that, m’kay?

But seriously, I may write a song.  Maybe that’s more of my meditation style.

Somewhat related:   Getting Off The Meds

 

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Mood Altering Paint Colors — Well, At Least That’s The Plan

Painting101_Lady-and-Paint_s4x3_al

I haven’t blogged in a while.  I’ve been painting.  Obsessively painting.  I wouldn’t quite call it manic on a clinical level, but yes, it had to be done.

Had to.

Be done.

Looking back, this has happened to me before.  I paint when something isn’t quite right.  The day after I had a miscarriage, I painted all of the hallway paneling in the old house.  I should have been resting.  I should have been crying.  Instead, I painted.

Then there was when my then husband went away on vacation with his club when we had many young children at home.  This, to me, was the perfect time to paint — everything– bold colors.  He came home to a purple kitchen, a hunter green eat in area and a bright sky blue play area.  I think I was jealous of his freedom, so, stuck at home, I changed my surroundings.  All while caring for multiple toddlers with open cans of paint around.  Perhaps not well-advised, but it had to be done.

Had to.

My Color Cry For Help!

My Color Cry For Help!

Later, after my husband left for good (or so I thought . . . but I digress . . . See Surveillance with My Mother and the When My Husband Moved Back Home — The Tale of Three Carries ) I  slapped beige paint over all of those colors in order to make my kaleidoscope house neutral for potential buyers.  My children didn’t help me at all.  They resented the change, hated  the beige.

We’re colorful people,” they said.

They were right.  We are colorful people,  but the HGTV gods told me I had to hide my crazy (Oops, I mean color).

Miranda Lambert, "Run and hide your crazy"  from the song Mama's Broken Hear

Miranda Lambert, “Run and hide your crazy” from the song Mama’s Broken Heart

Accordingly, all  the evidence of my color rebellion against my husband’s hobbies and freedom was –  neutralized.

Ready for Sale

Ready for Sale

I promised the children, however,  that when we moved to our new  house, we would bring color back.  As that little hoarders house smelled so badly, I painted right away, see That Hoarder’s Smell,  and I went bold: I had red living room, and the TV (family room) was a dark slate blue.

Not my house, but was my red.

Not my house, but was my red.

At one point I had an orange accent wall in my bedroom.

From the HP 033

The orange didn’t stay long, but it was there.

But lately, my little house had been pissing me off.  Well, everything has been pissing me off. The red was making me angry, I think. I’m already bitter, I don’t need to see red, literally. The dark blue was making me feel sad and closed in, like I was living in an elevator.

My home’s  overall darkness screamed despair and denial and hinted at failure, or maybe that was me . . .

Cell Block Tango, from Chicago

Cell Block Tango, from Chicago

I moved to this little hoarders’ house so that my kids could stay in the same schools.  I had to move, and it was all I could afford.  I was lucky to find it.   I’m fine with living small, but  I hate the neighborhood — which is on the lower end of the socio-economic scale — and it shows. Also, we are six tall people, and do our fair share of stepping over each other and our stuff.  But  I can’t move until they graduate, not even to a nearby neighborhood, unless there’s a big chunk of change in my near future. I’m still dealing with divorce debt.  Freedom ain’t free.

If I wanted to pull them out of school and move across country — well, I can’t do that either.  I’m divorced;  I’m not allowed to move without my ex-husband’s permission.  I’m stuck.

Parole Rejected, The Shawshank Redemption

Parole Rejected, The Shawshank Redemption

Until my youngest kids turn 18, my options are severely limited. Yes, I’m blessed to have a roof over my head, but sometimes it feels more incarceration than protection from the elements.

However, HGTV, the teachings of Feng Shui, and countless blogs suggest that if I change my surroundings I’ll change my life.

Meditation

I took a shot.

Had to.

So I’ve been painting, lightening up the color, lightening up my life.  It goes along with my constant search for non-medicinal treatments for anxiety and depression.

I have to say, the rooms do appear bigger, brighter, calmer.

Painting small rooms

Not my house, but similar room.

Still, I need color, so the plan is to get the color back through art and accessories.  That’s the plan anyway.

It’s a good plan.

Well, it was a good plan.

Glenn Close in Fatal Attraction. An open floor plan with bright white and neutral decor couldn’t hide her crazy.

Now I’m on the other side of not quite clinically manic, back to the depressed side of things.  Suddenly I’m too tired.  I don’t feel like hanging my old pictures or scouring yard sales for something colorful, because, at the end of the day, I’ll still be here.  And whatever I do, someone  in my house will hate it and loudly voice his or her displeasure.    So why bother, right?

Shawshank Poster

It’s like hanging posters in a jail cell.  Sure, it helps, but the most important thing on the wall is the calendar, marking off the days until release.

Just Me With . . . a bright new look, but not complete.  Methinks the angry red and the crying blues are bleeding through a bit.   But, hell, I’m giving it a shot.

 Release date?  Sometime in 2017.

The Shawshank Redemption. Paroled.

The Shawshank Redemption. Paroled.

Laughter Is The Best Medicine

One Day At A Time


RIP Bonnie Franklin

I’m just trying to make it “One Day At A Time” like divorced TV mom Annie Romano, except that I have two Barbaras and two Julies, and a boy.

Damn kids.

Let me set the scene. As per usual I was unsuccessful in getting certain tasks completed before the kids came back from a visit with their dad. As per usual none of the kids gave the requested heads up text to let me know they were on their way before they came. (I didn’t know what time they were coming home, only that they’d be home earlier than the required drop off time because one of the kids had a rehearsal.)

So the kids walked in to me in the middle of various projects — hanging a shelf, bagging their clothes they refused to wash, my private journal open on the kitchen table and Sex and The City blaring on all three TVs. (It’s one of my secret single behaviors to turn on all the TVs while cleaning so as I’m walking around the house I can still hear and glance at whatever is on. Don’t judge.) I was startled and felt like I got caught doing something wrong.

Turns out, I apparently had done something wrong.

My cleaning and organizing efforts were rewarded with a fit of rage from the Anxious child. Her twin, the Angry child was — guess what? Angry. As per usual, she did not enjoy her visit with her dad and brought her frustration home to me. The other kids just breezed in, dropped their stuff where they felt like it and perched various places in the house to eat the fast food their dad sent them home with. Someone got the Angry child’s order wrong and she was angry about that, too, no surprise. Somehow this anger was directed toward me.

It is always stressful when the kids get home. They’d only been gone for twenty-eight hours but the whole visitation process: getting them ready and out of the door when they’d rather not go, their behavior when they return, my guilt over how I choose spend my time when they are gone (not getting enough done, not having any fun) is always difficult. See Weekends Off.

After the tirade from the Anxious and Angry twins and my frustrated response, I still had to drive the oldest to rehearsal and get some dinner for myself.

During the drive I tried some relaxation techniques I’ve been reading about. I took deep breaths. I sat in my car for a bit to calm down. And, in an uncharacteristic move, when I returned I decided to sit down and watch something funny. Normally I would hide from my ill-tempered children or launch into a series of chores and attempt to get them to do the same. But instead I loaded the DVD player with my new favorite guilty pleasure, Pitch Perfect. Don’t judge. Okay, go ahead and judge. And yes, we own it.

Pitch Perfect

The girls joined me. When he returned from his rehearsal, the Arrogant one — the boy, retired to his boudoir as per usual. To his credit, he was doing a massive amount of homework that he saved for when he got back from the visit. His choice, his stress.

What people say about humor and music is true. Watching Pitch Perfect made me feel better. Miraculously, both the Anxious child and her twin, the Angry child, calmed down.

But when I got up to go into the kitchen to get a drink, however, I was met with a surprise.

Someone had opened every single cabinet and drawer in the kitchen.

It’s not just a matter of neatness, leaving cabinets open has scared the bejesus out of me way back to The Sixth Sense!

Do you remember the abused ghost wife and the open cabinets in The Sixth Sense?

The Sixth Sense Cabinets

I stopped dead in my tracks. I was already emotionally fragile.

I WAS TRYING TO CALM DOWN!!!!!

But those people I made, those people I grew in my belly like mold, those people know that having all the cabinets and drawers open frightens me!

It probably goes back to Poltergeist as well.

Poltergeist Cleared Tables

In Poltergeist someone or something cleared the table and pulled out the chairs.

Then someone or something stacked the chairs.

Then someone or something stacked the chairs.

I just don’t do well with kitchen surprises. I’m okay with bugs, I’ve dealt with some nasty stuff, see Piss, Puke and Porn, but open cabinets — scare me.

I froze in my steps, mouth agape. When I could finally move I gingerly walked the five steps back into the family room and cried to my four female spawn,

“WHO DID THAT? You know that scares me!”

Then I collapsed on the floor and laughed so hard I cried. I didn’t go back in my kitchen until I got a confession out of the Quirky one and ordered her to go in there and close everything up.

Oh, those people I made all had a good laugh about it. Great big belly laughs. I was a hysterical mess on the floor, but unlike some of my past days, it was in a good way.

Damn kids.

I guess the experts are right that laughter helps with depression and anxiety.

But does it have to be at my expense? Does it?

I just looked at my girl, the Quirky one — the Offender, and said,

“You used to be one of the ones that I liked.”

Just Me With . . . a weird phobia, an unexpectedly devious Quirky child and a good laugh — on the floor.

Given my mood, it was a bold move on the Quirky One’s part. I have to respect her risk-taking.

The mother throws holy water on her offending child in Hairspray.

The mother throws holy water on her offending child in Hairspray.

Shout out to Merbear who inspired me to write something positive about my girls. Well, I don’t know if it was positive, damn kids.

Other Kitchen Surprises:

A Rat In My House and Toilet or Kitchen Sink — Who Can Tell?

Another Kind Heart

Desperate Housewives, Bree and Gabby

Desperate Housewives,
Bree and Gabby

Last week I had another surprise interaction that touched me, deeply.

I was leaving my daughter’s basketball game and was stopped by another mother who I’ve been acquainted with for at least ten years, meaning before the separation and divorce.  Our oldest boys went to pre-school together and are in the same activities now.  Our daughters play the same sport.  We’ve never  socialized outside of school events, though.  She’s married, well-to-do (understatement), attractive and always stylish, and I suppose I always thought we didn’t have much in common on a personal level.  But unlike some of the downright snobby parents I’ve met, though,  she’s always been friendly, genuine, and approachable.

Desperate Housewives,Bree

Desperate Housewives,
Bree

That day, she approached me, and we chatted about some upcoming events.  Then she got personal.  She asked about my ex-husband’s new family.   Apparently he’d brought them all to a game recently.  I wasn’t there.  She must have been.  Seeing them must have made an impact.  She asked if I spent time with him, and I answered honestly, “No, we do things separately.”

She paused a moment, took a deep breath, then shared that her father had suddenly left her mother when she was a child, and that it had deeply affected her mother and the whole family and does to this day.  She spoke of eventual healing but said that according to her mother, who had no choice but to accept the situation, it just “wasn’t what she signed up for.”   She offered her support, saying that women should help each other more, but often we’re left feeling alone, just holding the bag.

She looked me square in the eyes and said,

“This must be hard for you.  And I want you to know that I know that.” 

And, standing there in the high school gym,  I felt like it was okay to admit that, yes, it is hard for me.   It felt good not to pretend otherwise, for just a moment.

Desperate Housewives,Bree and Gabby

Desperate Housewives,
Bree and Gabby

Just Me With . . . support, from an unlikely source, who knew just what to say.  I was deeply touched.

Other kind words:

Riding With My Boss

When I Needed A Helping Hand

 

 

 

Paint, Interrupted — a DIY Surrender

I’m getting my house painted this week. I know I’ve written about painting it myself, describing how That Hoarders Smell  inside the house was so bad that it engulfed me even while I was painting outside.  So yeah, I painted the house already.

But I never finished.

I painted the front under the porch.  Then I stood on the porch roof to paint the second floor.  And, along with my nephew, I perched on scaffolding temporarily left by another contractor as I prepped, primed and painted the back of the house.

That left the sides, where the paint was peeling so badly  that barely brushing by it caused a snow flurry of dirty paint flakes, some big, some small, some lead-based, some not.

This is actually how Creepy Neighbor No.1’s House looks now. Mine was similar, worse.

So although usually one preps, primes and paints from the top down, I started from the bottom up, reasoning that since we were about to move into this house I didn’t want the children to be exposed to this peeling paint at eye level. The upper floors weren’t peeling or flaking as badly as the lower level and at least no one would be touching it.  So, for safety’s sake I tackled the first floor.   Well, safety and the fact that I could reach the lower level and paint it myself without scaffolding or big ladders that I didn’t own.

The top side sections, however,  have not been prepped, primed, or painted.

It’s tacky.  It’s been this way for over two years.

Two Toned Home

I had every intention of painting the rest of the house myself. A contractor friend even lent me some scaffolding and we put it up on one side of the house.  Then, well, stuff happened, and  I  changed and  eventually went off my meds, which gave me vertigo, poor equilibrium, extreme dizziness, and severe sensitivity to light.  I couldn’t even think about doing  it then.   My friend eventually took his scaffolding back, unused.

Since then I have struggled with my half-painted house. I struggled to find the energy to paint my house, struggled to find the motivation and money, struggled to conquer my newly developed fear of heights, that I will fall and lay broken and bleeding in my yard —and no one will know.

I’ve struggled.

And, I lost my Mojo.  I’d done so much work on this little Hoarders house. I’d tried to make it nice.  I did make it nice. But recently I’ve been feeling that no matter what I do to this house, which sits on a busy street and backs up onto the perimeter of an poor neighborhood, it will always be compared to the much larger marital home situated in a park-like setting. I don’t miss that home at all,  and selling that home was one of the best decisions I’ve ever made — that decision may be a subject of another post — but I don’t love where we are now, I tried . . .

  • I installed a stone patio and fire-pit for us to enjoy — that no one uses.
  • I partially finished the basement so that we’d have a place for the drums and could jam — but no one does.
  • I made a music room for lessons for students that are fewer and fewer in number each year.
  • I planted shrubs to give us some privacy — that died.
  • I bought a shed to house bicycles — that nobody rides.

But. . .  I never finished painting the house.  Perhaps part of me became comfortable with my half painted house. Maybe it was some sort of  admission of defeat.   The move been an adjustment, a difficult adjustment.  I’m not going pretend otherwise —  anymore.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m proud of my accomplishments with respect to this home and my family. I’m happy that we have a roof over our heads and that the kids didn’t have to change schools — which was the reason why I bought the little hoarders home in the first place.   And I know things could be a lot worse, and that things aren’t really that bad, or really bad at all.

Still, the unfinished paint job screams that there are still struggles in this home.

Anyone looking at it would  ask,

“Cute house.  But when is she going to finish painting it?”

Well, the answer is “Now.”  I’m borrowing from Peter to pay Paul to pay some Painters that gave me a good deal because one of my “Friends Without Benefits” told them to.

I’m waving the white flag in surrender.  I  will not finish painting the house myself.  But I will not  leave it partially  unpainted for another year as a shrine to my  failure to renovate our way into happiness —  or the land of denial.  I’ve got to think of resale value and protect my investment.  So, I’ve called in the professionals.

It is what it is.  And it has to get done.   At least it won’t look tacky anymore.

“Maybe it will lift my spirits,” I thought, as I’ve been feeling a bit blue lately.

And then, the universe threw me a bone.

The painters here are very nice guys.  Just now one of them stopped me and said,

“I don’t want you to get a big head or anything, but I gotta tell you . . .   you look just like Halle Berry.  Hasn’t anyone ever told you that?  Mike (the other painter) said it yesterday, too.  I’m a movie buff, so I would know.” 

Halle Berry or it is me? Ha ha!!

I have to say, I’m starting to feel a lot better about hiring these guys to paint my house.  A lot better.

Just Me With . . . a paint job in progress, in butter cream with hunter green trim, done expertly  by — my new best friends.

Postscript:   The painting is finished.  The house looks great, it really does, and just in time for Winter.

Sadly, one of my kids informed me that her friends told her that they aren’t allowed to come to our neighborhood, for fear they might get mugged.

Whatever.

 

I’ve Declared Myself Undateable — Online and in General

I’ve made a conscious decision not to attempt online dating right now, or any kind of dating.  It’s not that I’m afraid of getting hurt or afraid of the crazies.    It’s just that, well, I hate all the boxes I have to check that define me.  It becomes an exercise in self-examination (humiliation) that is just no fun.  As in “How did this happen to me!!!!!

I’m not so good on paper online.  I have been married before; it ended in divorce.  Of course, that’s not uncommon, but  I have a  whole bunch of children (five, yes, five children) from that marriage, who live with me.   My career and net worth are, at least at present,  not what  they had the potential to be, for many reasons,  some  of which are related to the fact that I was married, had a lot of  children in a very short period of time, got dumped and  flipped out.

I’m pretty sure I wouldn’t be so good in person, either.  I’ve got nothing to talk about.  The course of my life and accomplishments have in no small part been  influenced by my  prior relationship, which, I know,  is not appropriate casual dating conversation.   For the last few years I have been dealing with the end of that relationship, recovery from  that relationship, and depression.  Again, not topics of  casual coffee talk with a stranger.   And talking about kids  is also a dating no-no.  Plus, I don’t have a list of  exciting hobbies and activities I’d like to discuss and share with a potential mate, except for the music stuff which I don’t feel the need to bring a man into.  And no, I don’t go to the gym, unless, of course,  you count the physical therapy I’m still attending to recover from the injuries I received from the dangerous and stupid combination of starting an exercise regimen and fighting with my daughter (she won, by the way).  My Aching Back.    So I’m not a lot of fun in person, I fear.  Don’t get me wrong,  I have a lot to offer, but I don’t have the energy or inclination or time to  peddle my potential to a stranger.

I realize how  negative I sound.    I’m depressed.  I should be dating Eeyore.  Now Eeyore and I, yeah, we  could hang out . . .  but I digress.

Eeyore

Regardless of all the reasons not to do it, I could put myself out there anyway and pretend to be a good date.   But here’s part two of the problem.    What (oh I’m sorry) Who would I get in response to my online profiles?   I’d get guys  who are  attracted to what I appear to be on paper online.   Well, that’s just scary.  I’m a little scary.   I know that.  Damn, I wouldn’t even respond to my own profile.    Still, when I create these profiles (and never pay), I do get poked or pinged or prodded or winked at or whatever  from men  –men who apparently  can tolerate the boxes that  I’ve  checked (oh the boxes, I check too many and too few).   When I see these connections,  I just want to scratch my head and say, “Dude, really, you’re into this?”  I mean, I can barely tolerate the boxes I check.  And if he checks the same boxes?  Oh what a motley crew we would make.

My checked boxes may accurately describe my situation,  but they don’t define me.  Really, they don’t.

Wait, do they? 

Do they?  !!!!!  (Singing:  “Excuse me, while I start to cry . . . ” Playing air guitar.)

Hendrix

Perhaps it comes down to the fact that I don’t want someone to share this current on paper online profile life with, I’d like some company in a very different life that I have yet to create, or failed to create in the past (Shut up, Eeyore).  So, no, I’m not ready online or otherwise to force a dating life.   I need to take care of me, manage or overcome this depression, work to get out of this financial hole my divorce  left me in.  Yada yada yada . . .

That  is the reasoned, socially correct conclusion.

That’s not me, either.

To be continued . . .

Just Me With  . . .  a decision not to force a dating situation.

See, Undateable, Part II.

She Wants To Break Me

The social worker said, “She wants to break you.”  She, being my daughter.

The reasons why there is a social worker in my house are beyond what I feel like writing about now.  But know that it was my reaching out for help, not a protective services situation.   My daughter is struggling with anger and depression and literally ran  — I mean ran  from traditional counseling.  You haven’t lived until you’ve chased a child around a therapist’s office, but I digress.  Consequently, I sought another route which brings professionals to the house.

Over the years I had done what I was supposed to do.   I told the children what they needed to know about the separation and divorce and move based on their age and capacity to understand.   I did not talk about the legal aspects of it.   The children never knew that I suffered through  dealing with various court filings (actually for me I was usually responding to my husband’s filings) and court appearances.   They don’t know about the financial and professional ruin and my poor health.     They were too little, it was appropriate to shield them.    The younger ones don’t seem to remember my good old-fashioned nervous breakdown and years, literally  —  years of tears.   I suppose that’s good.  I know it’s good.  When my children are grown and thinking back  on their childhood and mother I don’t want them to  recall an image of me lying on the  kitchen floor sobbing.  That’s not cool.

She has stated that her  misery is because we moved from the big marital home in the nice neighborhood, but I think it’s more.   I agree, she wants to break me.   I believe she thinks any appearance of strength or acceptance on my part somehow negates her feelings of loss.  The more comfortable I get with leaving the old life — the old house, the more miserable she seems.

What she doesn’t know is that I’m already broken, I broke down long ago, my loss was substantial.  For the last few years I’ve just been in survival and repair mode, with medications and counseling as needed, along with a fair amount of carpentry.   As the children have gotten older I’ve enhanced explanations  and have told them they can ask me anything and I will respond (age appropriately). I’ve explained why we had to move, and why we moved to where we are now . . . but she’s too young and too miserable right now to hear it.

Still, she is old enough to know that  our move to a much smaller house in a poor neighborhood is not merely a new adventure; she can see that we have taken a step down, socio-economically.  She also knows that her Dad also has a new life —  with new people  in it — and that’s just the way it is.

But, without acceptance of it all, it stinks.

Plus, my daughter is savvy, suspicious, practical and depressed enough to outright reject the “positive spin” talk.  I’ve tried.  She’ll need a different angle.  She’s a lot like me that way.

And let’s face it, misery loves company, and she wants me to be miserable and angry, too.  (I am, but I try not to show it.)

Though I’m thankful she feels comfortable enough with me to express  her feelings, especially since she is uncomfortable with her Dad,  I still want to (but won’t) say,

Don’t break me, girl.  You need me, more than you know.   I’m all you got.   I am not invincible.  I am human, even though I am your  mother.  Don’t break me.  Please. I’ve been broken before, you don’t remember — but it ain’t pretty.

So when I recently tweeted, “I will not cry, I will not cry, I will not cry”  after the heart wrenching session with my daughter and the social worker, it was because it hurt me to my soul and I feared that if I cried I would never stop.   I know, sounds overly dramatic, but sometimes . . . it is.

Just Me With . . .  some struggles.

My Aching Back

The Super-Soaker Incident

I’m not an exercise monger, but I’ve always been active one way or another.   I’ve only thrown my back out three times in my life.   The first time was at the beach.  It was a  drive-by water gun shooting  incident  initiated by my nieces and nephew.

My niece, the driver, drove up all slow like, the mini-van door silently opened, and her brother opened fire (water) on  my sisters and I, which included his own mother.  We scattered.   I pivoted hard to dive into the brush to avoid the assault.  They hit and drove off  quickly into the night.   My sisters and I walked back to the beach house — dripping and sore.  By the next day I couldn’t move.   It only lasted a day, though.

Natural Flagstone is very heavy.

Fast forward to last year.  I was laying a natural flagstone patio in my back yard.   And by “I” — I mean “I”.   I had help from guy friends for a couple of days for the really big stones, see Friends Without Benefits, but  most days I was on my own.    I’m always so careful with my projects, safety first, safety last, safety always.   After the drive-by incident I have been living by the mottoes:   “Lift with your knees, not your back”   and  “Take your time.”     But one night  after I’d completed the work for the day, actually after I’d completed the whole patio,  I made a mistake.  Instead of getting up to get my toolbox, I turned to grab it.   I was probably already weakened from the heavy lifting anyway, but it was that quarter turn that got me down, literally.   I felt a sudden pain in my lower back.   After two or three days of  back pain  and walking funny, I got better.  Still, I was benched from hard labor for a couple of weeks.

Now this.

This was supposed to be  part of my trying to manage my chronic  depression.   Changing what I can, acknowledging what I can’t, making attainable goals, knowing that I can’t do it all,  taking care of me.  Blah, blah, blah.  I had gotten off the daily meds, see Getting Off The Meds, but I still have to be able to combat the depression without them.   Universally the pros say that exercise is key.   Now, I’ve been extremely physically active over the last couple of years, practically speaking.  In addition to dealing with five kids, I’ve packed up,  moved and renovated a house.    I’m talking about being on ladders, heavy lifting, digging, up and down stairs constantly.    But much of that work is done now.  I thought I would try to start running.   It’s cheap and effective.

Always so careful, I decided that running on a nice rubber track would be easier on my body and bones,  plus I could keep track of how far I have gone and avoid being seen by the general public.   I was surprised at how well I was able to keep going, running painfully slowly but continuing nonetheless.  Mind you,   I hate running, but  I knew it would be good for me.   I used to run track in school, which I loved, but absent the  chance of getting a medal at the end, well, running for the sake of running has never been as fun for me.

Coming off of the back to school preparation with  five kids,  who can be difficult (autism, anxiety, depression), I was feeling overwhelmed.   Still, I had been so proud of myself  about getting the things done on my do-to list, getting the paperwork and physicals ready for five kids in a more timely fashion than in previous years, making sure they had the school supplies and clothing needed to start school, getting organized, girls’ hair done,  etc.   and having done all of this after having taken the kids on our first cross-country road trip.

Despite my careful planning, budgeting, “to do” lists and many trips to stores,   one of my daughters (the anxious one) flipped out about not having “the right” pair of sneakers for volleyball try-outs.   I tried to tell her that she has  the perfect shoes to wear for the first day, actually for  the whole season —  basketball shoes.   Volleyball is played on the basketball court, so that made sense to me. Plus, if she made the team and actually needed different shoes we could deal with that later.     She wasn’t hearing it.   She also refused to acknowledge that fact that even if  I wanted to, I could not take her  shoe shopping  in one  hour we had before her dad was scheduled to  pick her up for the dinner visit  (he doesn’t do any of the school preparation —- don’t ask).   I tried to tell her that by the time we got to the store, parked and looked at shoes it would be time to come home.   She did not believe me.   Instead, she became furious with me.   She was completely agitated.   She said everyone would notice she had the wrong shoes.   The more I told her that was not the case, the angrier she got, accusing me of causing her never to be prepared.

I’m reminded of  one of my favorite movies lines, from a woman to her grown daughter: “I never should have encouraged you to speak.”    I talked to my babies incessantly, so they would learn.   Now?   They spew nastiness at me.

The Shoes Had A Red Swoop, Unacceptable

We weren’t going to the store and she was angry about it.   She was completely convinced that she would not be prepared for try-outs and would be embarrassed.  And that this was all my fault.  

I had not anticipated this.   This was not on my things to do list.    I tried to explain that she would not be the only one wearing basketball shoes on the basketball court.  (By the by, I know this for a fact because her three sisters would be there, also wearing basketball shoes on the basketball court).  She wasn’t hearing that, saying that people (always these unnamed people) would notice her shoes because her shoes were different from her sisters’  black basketball shoes because  her shoes have a  red swoop (gasp!)  Whoa.  I did not see that coming either.   I tried to explain that if she chose not to wear her basketball shoes she could wear her other sneakers.  Her response?   They were too small .   ( She was wearing them at the time.)    I explained  that if she’s grown out of her every day sneakers and needed new ones that I would take her to get some but I just could not  take her then (because of the visitation order and all, which pisses me off, too, but I digress.)

Why couldn’t she understand?

But she was being completely unreasonable.  Generally speaking, an unreasonable person cannot be reasoned with.   This I know.   I must have forgotten it then, though.

So many things send this child into a frenzy —  from having a braid that doesn’t hang properly,  to someone burping in the car, to thinking everyone will notice that her sister’s hair is longer, to seeing a bug, to hearing someone talk about a book or movie,  to being asked if her homework is done, to someone using her soap, to not being the first at . . . well, everything. etc.     Note to parents of boys:  This is not typical girl behavior.  This is over the top.  I’m only scratching the surface here.

I lost it.

Well, I lost sight of the fact that there was no reasoning with her.   I wanted her to understand.   I was tired of the back talk and the refusal to hear common sense — i.e. there is simply no time to go to the store right now!    So when she tried to walk away from me, I blocked her.   Physically blocked her.  I just wanted her to hear me say that —  yes she would be prepared for try-outs, that no one will notice her shoes, that I will take her shopping when the schedule permits.  I don’t know,  maybe I wanted some recognition  for trying to get her what she needs, if not everything she wants.   Mostly, I didn’t want her to walk away from me while I was talking.

So I blocked her.  Or at least I tried.   Rookie mistake.

My body  was already weakened by my previous day’s running.  This child is my smallest child,  but she’s strong . . .  and headstrong.

She dropped to all fours, like some sort of ninja wrestler,  and began to push by me . . . with her head!

I admit, this pissed me off.  “This child was not going to physically intimidate me.”  Or so I thought.

I reached down to pull her up.   (Lift with your knees, not your back, lift with your knees not your back, LIFT WITH YOUR KNEES, NOT YOUR BACK!!!!!!)

But it was too late.

I had reached down  and pulled up.   It was classic poor lifting technique.  I heard a snap, felt a sudden pain in my left lower back and fell to the floor.

She stepped over me.  I was roadkill.

Volleyball? Really?  Clearly this child has missed her calling — I’d say wrestling or football are in her future — or prison.

This back injury has by far been the worst and the longest.

I rested it.  It started to feel better.   Then a different child wanted her hair flat ironed for her class picture.   I thought I could do it, if I took my time and rested.   No, the bending or whatever, the next day I was almost as bad as the first day.   Then I caught a cold from another daughter who has a disgusting habit of letting her used tissues lie about the house.   But, of course, when I caught it, I got it much worse than she had it.  Every time I coughed or sneezed or had a chill it sent my back into spasm.  That was the first week.

The second week came with one gig and two back-to-school nights which prohibited any real rest for me.  Too much walking and lifting.  For the gig I had to swallow my pride and out of necessity asked a fellow musician help me carry and set up my gear.   At the last minute, though,  he couldn’t help.   I often rely on the kindness of strangers, and got the sound man to help, I had no choice. But it was not ideal, and it was stressful.   Then I came home  to children who had not done their homework or cleaned up after themselves.   My progress regressed.  So sore.

Later in the week I had to attend two back-to-school nights, one of which in theory required me to be in four places at once, eight periods in a row.  I felt beat down.    But the kicker was when the anxious ninja wrestling child had  yet another fit because she needed my help with her homework — at midnight.  She had refused to do it earlier.   She refused to let me rest.   I could not remove her physically and she followed me where ever I went.  She was in tears worrying that she would be in trouble and unprepared.    Again, somehow,  it was all my fault.    Still,  my help, in her world,  must not include actually talking to her or reviewing the assignment.  No, no,  it  consisted of me  just  sitting being there and taking the verbal assault  from a child who is truly distressed and anxiety ridden.  (I’m looking to get her some help, in case you’re wondering.)    It was hard to sit in one position while she worked so I thought, stupidly,  “I’ll empty the dishwasher.”   ( “Resting” my back had turned my house into potential  Hoarders episode).  So, I carefully leaned over to pick up one plate, just one plate . . .  and  . . .  snap!

My progress had regressed yet again.

The pain!   It had gotten so bad I actually went to the doctor, not usually my thing.   He gave me  muscle relaxants, told me to take Tylenol, gave me back exercises, and I got a flu shot.

Oh yeah, and did I mention the dog was sick?    She was vomiting and had diarrhea all over the downstairs, the floors are tile and therefore easy to clean — but not if you can’t bend over.   Lovely.

By the time the dog was pooping blood I figured she had to go to the vet.   She weighs only 12 pounds yet I had trouble picking her up. I made the girls go with me to help.    I had a back spasm at the vet parking lot, good thing the girls were with me, they had to check in for us while I was outside leaning against the railing, waiting for the spasms to subside long enough to go in.

The Vet said, “You don’t look like you’re doing too good.”  Yeah, ya think?  Embarrassing.  Painful.  Typical.

Well, things got bad before they got better, the cold with the back spasms continued throughout the  weekend.   The kids went with their Dad for their half-weekend, which left me to deal with the dog’s poop and vomit — alone.

The kids had only been gone for 34 hours but when they got back they immediately asked me,

“What’s wrong with your face, Mommy?  Why do you have droopy eyes like Daddy?”

“I do not have droopy eyes!!”  My indignant response.   (I have my suspicions as to why Daddy has droopy eyes, but I digress.)

I was deeply hurt.  I mean,  I was  in pain and I had a cold and certainly was not at my best,  but still there was no need to insult my looks.   When I finally hobbled to a mirror I was slapped with understanding.    Bumps, welts, and swelling all over my face, neck, shoulders.   Lovely.

Then the itching began.  Lovely and fun.

What was it?  The muscle relaxants?   The flu shot?

Back to the doctor, who determined I had developed hives . . . probably from the Ibuprofen,  and told  me to switch to  Acetaminophen.

Yup, Yup.

More attempts to rest  my back, which meant no housework, but I still had to do everything else.   Not to mention the anxious child and the depressed child have been fighting . . .  a lot.  But I kept my physical distance.    I’ve learned my lesson.   And I had another gig, which required moving the gear again.  But this was week three and I’d started to  feel a little bit better.  I thought I could handle it. I moved my gear slowly, using my knees, not my back.    I asked for and accepted help when I could get it, but I was still alone.   I’m always alone . . .  I  digress again.    At least by this time the hives were small and couldn’t be seen from a distance, even though my face  felt like sandpaper.  No matter, nobody was going to be touching me.  Sigh.    I got my gear moved and played the gig.  But the next day?

Ow.

Apparently the pain was just packing up to move elsewhere.   Since the gig I have had excruciating constant pain from my  hip to  my  knee.  Both interior muscular and  exterior pain —  it hurts to the touch like a burn.    The internet gods tell me that this is sciatica, nerve damage which can follow a back injury.   Whatever, it hurts.

This time I  just made a call to the doctor, because I don’t feel like going anywhere.  (Plus, I’m afraid he thinks I have a crush on him by this point.)   My doctor referred me to physical therapy.   I’m still taking the muscle relaxants and I can also take sleeping pills, he advised,   since I’ve been unable to sleep.  Let’s hope I don’t end up on Intervention.  (Wow, a Hoarders and Intervention reference in the same post, A&E should be paying me, but I digress, yet again.)

In the meantime, the demands from my kids are unrelenting.   At least the dog got better.   But the complaints from the kids about our house being too small and that everybody else has an iPhone and iPad and “I’m so bored” coupled with, can you pick me up or  . . . can you take me . . . can you buy me . . . and can I do . . . blah, blah, blah . . .  Well, it’s all a bit much these days.   Feeling this badly for so long  has not helped my depression.  I’m coming up on week four.   The tears are back, one time in public.   Ugh.

My grand plans for  taking care of  me, taking charge of some things, well,  everything has been “back-burnered.”  heh heh.    Actually, this sh*t ain’t funny.

My load is a bit too heavy right now.   Ask my back.

Anyone out there considering running? —  Or having children, for that matter?   Give me a call.  I’ll have you channel surfing on your couch, popping birth control pills and swaddled in a body condom in no time.

Just Me With . . . a different kind of “back story.”

Getting Off The Meds

I was depressed . . .

I had been on this particular anti-depressant for a year, had been on others before that  (since my husband moved out).   The medicine, coupled with therapy, helped me during a very, very bad time.   With the medicine I was better than I had been during those darkest days.  But was I still depressed?  Absolutely.  Because of my general poor health, diet and limited success on the meds,  “they” (meaning my psychiatrist, but “they” sounds as impersonal as it  felt then)  switched me from one anti-depressant  to another, then another.    I had made strides, was functional to a certain extent, but still had what they called “major episodic depression”  . . . and when I was bad, I was really bad.  And with that last medicine I was on,  I felt numb,  less creative  and I suffered from fatigue —  falling asleep behind the wheel — kind of fatigue. Emotionally, it seemed as though I had reached a plateau but from time to time, I would just  fall off.

I simply wasn’t snapping out of  it.

Then, after a particularly rough descent into a depressive episode, they suggested that my condition be treated more aggressively.  In addition to stepped up therapy, there were more meds prescribed — “add-ons” they called them — additional medicines to take on top of the daily anti-depressant I was already taking.

The first “add-on” affected my eyesight.   I could barely read anything.   Also, it made me  manic,  it wasn’t unusual for me to be  doing landscaping at 2:00 am and I– could– not–stop.  (My yard looked great, though, but I digress.)

When I complained of not being able to see, and of being so agitated and let’s face it, weird,  they switched me to a different add-on.   Additionally, as part of a larger plan, since my general health and diet had improved,  I requested a change in my daily main anti-depressant and asked if I could go back to the one that didn’t make me fall asleep in odd places.   They didn’t allow me to change at first, but since my fatigue had gotten worse– almost falling asleep at the kitchen sink — and I was eating better than before, they said I could change.   (Reportedly, without adequate nutrition the other anti-depressant could cause seizures.  Wonderful.  But I had been eating better, and promised to continue doing so.)

So they instructed me, in writing, to:

Week One: 

  • Cut the dosage of my  current  main anti-depressant  in half,
  • Discontinue taking the first add-on
  • Begin new add-on medication, one I’d never taken before.

Week Two:

  • Discontinue current main anti-depressant completely,
  • Begin another anti-depressant, one I’d used before but had fewer side effects (meaning, I was awake)

In other words, my doc had told me to switch both my main anti-depressant and the add-on  during a two-week period.

Okay, whatever,” I thought.  I just wanted to be able to see, be conscious, sit still and maybe get some creativity– some of the “me” back.

I followed the instructions.

But I had problems with the new “add-on.”     That particular medication warned that if you get a rash from it, especially in your eyes,  you could die.  My eyes started itching,  I had that kind of rash.    Since they didn’t know which meds were causing it, and it was potentially fatal, I was told to stop taking everything, cold turkey.   So, I did.

No one told me there could be side effects, no one told me there was withdrawal.

First I became so, so dizzy.  I would walk into door jams, stumble around in my little house.   I had been in the midst of home improvement projects that required me to be up on a ladder.  I couldn’t even think of it.   My equilibrium was off.  Way off.

Then came the nausea and diarrhea.

Because of my history, Confessions of a Skinny Mom, I am no stranger to stomach ailments.  But this was different.  Sudden flu or food poisoning-like symptoms hit me, hard.

Damn, am I sick?

I kept having to go to the bathroom.   “Whoa,”  I thought. “This isn’t normal.  Had I eaten something bad ? ” I wondered.

Without going into the gory details, suffice it to say that I stopped keeping track of my bathroom visits after eight  trips to the toilet in an hour.  I was too sensitive to sights and smells to camp out in there.   Ewwww!  So back and forth I went.  (No pun intended.)

Next came the brain zaps.  It’s so hard to describe.  It’s like getting hit in the head with a heavy blunt object, but without the external pain.   Sudden flashes of light out of nowhere, caused by nothing, but strong enough to make me stop talking, lose my train of thought, blink, cringe, shudder,  look around

. . . at nothing.

Then light became my curse.  It hurt to open my eyes, it didn’t matter whether it was artificial or sun light —  any light hurt.   I started to wear sunglasses inside, at night.   Sound bothered me as well, but not as much as light.   Unless — it was the phone.    I couldn’t hold a phone to my ear;  I thought my ears would bleed.   I had to talk on speaker or I couldn’t talk at all.

I lived like a vampire, a  vampire with the runs.  (TMI?  I know,  it was too much for me, too.)

I shouldn’t have been driving. 

Still,  the kids had to get places and I didn’t know what was wrong with me.   I tried to work through  it.  It’s a mom thing.  I was trying to play it off.  Wrong.  So wrong.  Clearly I hadn’t learned my lesson from my previous illnesses I ignored.  “Almost F*cked to Death.”    And did I mention it was Halloween and I have five kids?   I did the best I could, and I did more than I should have, but it wasn’t much fun that year.  Not at all.   I told the kids I was sick and they’d have to be patient with me.  I usually enjoy Halloween, but that year?  — well, it was just too damn scary.

On the road it felt as though cars were coming right at me, like some sort of horror movie and awful amusement park ride combined . . . on drugs.  I missed turns in my own neighborhood.   I yelled at the kids to be quiet because I had to concentrate on what I was doing.  It took so much focused energy to go forward.  I white knuckled the steering wheel, for dear life.  It was counter-intuitive, really. I mean,  I know not to drive while under the influence.     But my impaired driving was because I  wasn’t taking anything.   It didn’t make sense.  Bottom line, though,  my judgment, reflexes, everything was impaired.   I should not have been on the road.  

And I was so weak.  So weak.   I recall going to the store and needing a cart —  to hold myself up.   I couldn’t walk without swooning, and I had to close my eyes from time to time, even with sunglasses on.   Like having a bad flu, I hurt all over.

Mentally, it took its toll as well, mainly because I didn’t know what was happening to me.  The brain zaps and the light sensitivity,  the nausea and the lack of depth perception and compromised equilibrium — it all started to affect my judgment.    I wouldn’t say I was suicidal, exactly,  but I wasn’t thinking right.  I was agitated, confused.  I thought I was going crazy.   It wasn’t pretty.  When I thought of what I went through alone, and what could have happened, I still shudder.  I wasn’t thinking  clearly at all.  I didn’t have another adult to talk to about it.  Paranoia had set in.

I was alone on that worst first night, fending off invisible blows to my head in a darkened room that seemed to keep spinning around.  But a friend happened to call me, an acquaintance, really. I answered (on speaker) out of desperation, I was close to quiet hysteria.   She casually asked how I was doing.   Now I had diarrhea again —  of the mouth.  I quickly  told her I wasn’t doing too well, confessed I had been on meds, developed  side effects and stopped taking them pursuant to doctor’s orders but was freaking out!    And I described to her how I felt.   Poor thing,  I know she wasn’t expecting so much information from me, but she listened, and was concerned.   (I probably sounded like a maniac.)   She talked me down from some of my agitation and convinced me to call the doctor.  To this day I don’t remember who called me that night.

But the next day was Sunday, and Halloween, and did I mention I have five kids?  Poor kids.  I wasn’t my normal Halloween loving  self.  We got through it.  By the time I got a message returned from my psychiatrist and told her how I was feeling,  she  said that I sounded sick and should  see a doctor.  Ya think?  Wait.  What?   Isn’t SHE  a doctor?   Yes, yes, she is, but she suggested I  see my regular primary care physician or go to the emergency room.   I  didn’t feel up to taking myself to the ER so I  waited to see my regular doctor.    He told me he thought my symptoms were from the withdrawal from the first anti-depressant, not the rash-making add-on.  He said I could keep working through it and see what life is like off the meds.

Huh, I thought.  So far, life off the meds hurt like hell and . . .  IT WAS STARTING TO PISS ME OFFEverything was starting to piss me off.   Ahh yes, another lovely discontinuation effect of which I had not been warned.

The Shining

Rages, they call them.  Sudden fits of anger.  Lovely.   I should have been chained to a pipe in a dark basement with nothing but a pissy mattress.

When I felt well enough to do research, I found that I was not alone, that this medication is almost never stopped cold turkey because of the horrific “discontinuation effects.”   Patients usually plan to ween over a period of months,  not days, and still suffer.   Some liken the symptoms to heroin withdrawal and even suggest that cold turkey discontinuation only be attempted while hospitalized.  But it’s not about a craving for the medication, anti-depressants don’t really work like that,  it’s about the physical withdrawal the body goes through when the medicine is taken away.  Because the withdrawal symptoms can be so debilitating, patients often plan the withdrawal during a time when they can take off work and all other responsibilities. Silly me, attempting cold turkey withdrawal while caring for five kids — at Halloween.   But I didn’t know.

Armed with this information,  I talked to my psychiatrist again, this time in person, and explained all of my symptoms and what my other doctor had said.  She advised that my only choice was to  start taking a low dosage of the same  anti-depressant again and ween slowly from that.

What?  Start taking it again?  What? 

Hoping that I’d already suffered through the worst of it, I decided not to start taking the drug again.  My shrink apologized for not telling me that there could be “discontinuation effects.”  How could she not tell me?  Yeah, I was pissed, sitting there in her office, with my sunglasses on, blinking after the brain zaps.   I was pissed.  And I looked like hell.

The zaps went on for months, as well as the light sensitivity, lethargy and dizziness.   It was not unusual for me to wear sunglasses in the grocery store, at night, leaning on a cart.   Pitiful.  But don’t talk to me.  I might not be nice.  Shhhh.

Imagine having a hangover while on a spinning carnival ride while seated next to someone who annoyed the hell out of you and who kept clocking you in the head.   Yeah  . . .  like that.

It’s been almost a year now.  I’m still suffering from some long-term discontinuation effects.   I  have trouble putting  a phone to my ear, I never go anywhere without sunglasses,  and I’m often suddenly irritable — but less so now.  I have other physical symptoms — but these may or may not be a result of  dealing with depression without medication.   I don’t know.

Regardless, I wish I would have known that there was a possibility that I would suffer so from simply stopping the medication.  If I had, I would have thought twice about starting this particular drug in the first place.  Had I known — what I learned too late,  I absolutely would have planned my discontinuation of the medicine so very differently, or at the very least timed it differently.

And this I know:  I will never take anything again without researching not only the possible side effects while taking the medication, but the possible effects of discontinuing it.

In the end, I am just very grateful that  I didn’t accidentally or intentionally cause any harm to myself or others while going through the withdrawal.

It was a horrible experience.

Just Me With OUT . . .  Cymbalta.

Depression hurts . . .  Cymbalta can help.   But if you stop taking it . . . beware.    Bwa ha ha ha!      www.CymbaltaWithdrawal.com

P.S.  I am not against the use of anti-depressants, or add-ons, or whatever it takes.  And I know that some people do not suffer any discontinuation effects.   My medicines got me off the floor during a unspeakably painful time.  So no judgment on people taking medicine for depression.  I do believe, however, that discussion of the type, timing, dosage, length of treatment and effects of discontinuation of treatment should be initiated by the prescribing physician and thoroughly discussed.   There was much I didn’t know, and wasn’t thinking clearly enough to ask or research on my own.  I was uninformed, and that’s never good.

How Do I Feel About My Ex-Husband Getting Married?

Julianna Margulies, in (ironically) “The Good Wife”

I heard somewhere that a good lawyer can take two inextricably  related concepts — facts that are fused together, if you will —  and think of them separately.  Yin from the Yang.  Well, I’m still a lawyer.  When I was practicing, before all the children, depression and heartbreak, I was a good lawyer.   I can do this.

So “but for” the kids, how do I feel about my ex-husband’s wedding? 

Up until now my concerns about the wedding  have been the poor way in which it was announced to me via the kids (unsuccessfully, see How I Found Out that My Ex-Husband Is Getting Married), the kids’ reluctant involvement in it, dealing with one kid’s downright hysteria about it, and the other kids’ unusual silence.  Also, I’ve had to deal with the happy couple taking the children shopping to dress them  for the event and the changes in the visitation  schedules necessitated by the  preparation for  and  the event itself.

On a personal level, I admit that since this will be the first time since they were little that  the girls have all gotten dressed up for anything — and it’s for their father’s wedding — and I am not involved –well,  that smarts a bit — but again that  has to do with the  kids.   Additionally,  I worry that if  I do become upset about the wedding, either teary or angry, how will that make the kids feel when they get home?   But that’s still about the kids.   Plus, I have thought about  how it will be to have to deal with this woman with respect to the children  going forward once she gets her “Mrs” since there have  been some issues.  But again, the issues are all related to the kids.  It’s  all stuff all related —  directly or indirectly–  to the children.

So I’ll  do the lawyerly thing and take the kids completely out of the analysis.  

Accordingly, with respect to making a determination as to how I feel regarding my ex-husband’s impending nuptials,  I hereby order that for the purposes of this post, and this post only, such determination shall be made without any consideration whatsoever of   the minor children born to me  and him during our now dissolved union.

It’s a stretch, but  . . . okay — be gone– thoughts of children!!!

Now how do I feel about my ex-husband getting married?

F*ck if I know.  

Really, sorry for the profanity . . . but I guess I’m a little  freaked out by the fact that I don’t feel much about it.

Is this going to be one of those things when I think I’m fine and then I end up in a heap on the floor calling my counseling hotline?  I really don’t think so.

I’ve had two friends volunteer to “do something”  with me that day.   Am I gonna need that?    I mean, okay,  maybe I shouldn’t do “nothing” that day, but really, I’ve done the nervous breakdown thing before and this doesn’t feel like that.  And I’d like to, need to, spend more time with friends, but not necessarily on that day simply because it is his wedding day.

It seems that people  are afraid I will fall apart because of all that I’ve been through.   But, for once, perhaps because of all that I’ve been through,  I don’t think that I will — fall apart.

Again, taking everything else away (and there’s a lot)  . . .

I really don’t think that my ex-husband getting married is a matter of my concern.

I don’t care.

Huh.  There you have it.

So ordered.  Judgment in favor of “I don’t give a f*ck.”

That said, the kids will be gone for a few hours that day.  Now that I’ve established that I don’t have  feelings about him getting married (again, taking the real crap out of the analysis), what should I do on his wedding day?   I don’t feel like planning something particularly special or completely out of the ordinary  because that seems so . .  .  well  . . .  reactive. 

So . . . what to do?  What to do?  (Or, did I just completely sidestep how I feel by finishing up by talking about what I should do?)

Just Me With . . . no feelings about and no plans for my Ex-Husband’s Wedding Day. 

Postscript:  His wedding day has come and gone.   I Was The Nanny When My Ex-Husband Got Married

Related Posts:   He’ll Be Married, I’ll Be Free

I Don’t Love Him