Tag Archives: real estate

The Sofas on the Side of the Road Are Killing My Property Value!

Couch

Not my neighborhood couch.

I’ve been in my former hoarders fixer house for a while now.  And, as was always the plan, I will sell it — if the universe and my credit score allow– upon or just prior to or just after my youngest kids’ graduation from high school.  I have a couple of years, but I’m thinking ahead.    I probably won’t see  a dime in return on investment for all the improvements I’ve made to my little hoarders home. There are a lot of reasons.  But for this post I’ll focus here on my neighbors’ damn sofas sitting on the side of the road because that’s what’s bothering me today, every day.

Sofas, couches, easy chairs.  Whatever you call them.  Indoor furniture that is banished outside to publicly decompose for all to see  —  it’s the worst lawn decor ever.

It’s the modern day real estate equivalent to the head on a stick.

It’s crap like this that will lower my property value and keep it low — which is good for the contractors who want to buy low and rent or flip high — but bad for  me. There are plenty of regular folks looking for an affordable houses in a nice neighborhood in a good school district, but because of the ever present sofas on the side of the road, it makes my neighborhood seem, well, not so nice.

Have you ever wondered why people put sofas outside which stay there for weeks, months, even years?

I have my theories.

1.  They got a new couch.  So they put the old one outside.

2.  The old couch had something nasty happen to it — of the urine or vomit variety –that they just couldn’t get out.

3.  The old couch had something smokey happen to it — the old cigarette in the cushions . . .

But wait!

This only explains why the couch leaves the house, not why it stays outside.

Here are my theories on why they stay outside.

1.  There is no (free) bulk trash pickup in the neighborhood.

2.  Bulk trash pick-up is costly and low income (poor) people can’t  or won’t allocate their money to pay for it.

Paying extra for trash removal can be a hard pill to swallow if you are having trouble paying regular bills (Query:  How much money was shelled out on the new sofa? Perhaps the $25 bulk trash fee should be built into the cost of getting the new couch?)   But regardless, there’s a solution.  If you are able bodied you can save the $25 by breaking up the couch and putting it in the regular trash.  I’ve done this.  I’ve seen other people do this. It’s actually kind of fun it you want to get out some aggression. And another option is, if the sofa is old but not ruined, put it on Craigslist for free. Someone will take it.  Craigslist people won’t pay a dollar for something, but if you say it’s free? They’ll take it.  They’ll even take it from your house.  If you don’t want strangers in your house, just plan to put the couch out on a sunny weekend, post the ad, and it will go away — for free.  I’ve done this.  More than once.  If it’s truly trashed, this isn’t an option, but it’s worth a try.

The Bermuda Triangle on

The Bermuda Triangle on “How I Met Your Mother”

3.  I’m waiting for bulk trash pick-up.

But dude, how long are you going to wait?

Once a year,  our Township provides dumpsters for people in my neighborhood to use free of charge for whatever they need to get rid of.  But it’s once a year.  In the Summer, I believe.  It’s Winter now.  Will the sofas sit here until July?

A variation on this excuse is:  I put it out and wanted to see if the trash guys would take it.  Okay, I get that.  Because sometimes they might actually take it, or somebody might.  This only justifies having an outdoor sofa for a week, though, tops.  After a week has gone by of the regular trash people not picking up the sofa, it ain’t going nowhere.

4. Another reason proffered by well-meaning people is that the residents must not be physically able to get rid of the couch.

Well, I call bullshit on that one.  If a person had the means and muscle to get the couch out of his or her house, they have the means and muscle to put it somewhere where it might get picked up.  Obviously there are  elderly or disabled (mentally or physically) who cannot maintain their property.  I get that.  But I’ve seen grown, strong, working men coming and going from these houses with the lawn couches.  I call bullshit on them.  I know people may have ailments that are not readily visible.  I withdraw my calling of bullshit if that is the case.  But if not,  just putting indoor furniture in your yard and leaving it out in the rain, sleet, and snow until starts to stink, disintegrate, become the nesting ground for vermin and bugs, and just look plain old tacky —  I just don’t get that.

Right now there are two couches I see every day. Every day.

Every damn day.

Couch Number One.  It’s in a  back yard, which backs onto my alley and my back yard.  I see it from my kitchen window, as I said.  Every day.  As do at least four other houses and all cars that drive along this back alley.  Lovely. This  placement is curious to me, because their trash gets collected from their front yard.  Why put the couch out back, inside their fence, on its side, cushions and all?  Why?  It won’t get picked up there by anyone.  Maybe they are planning to have bulk trash pickup or somebody with a truck come later — but it’s been about a month now.  And why leave the cushions? They could certainly go in the regular trash or recycling and this would cut down on the bulk of the sofa in the yard and also make it less inviting for bugs and rats. But no, the couch is outside.

Couch Number Two. This one is on the edge of a front yard of a house  on the side of the road. Now this house has always had a messy porch.  I  don’t know the people, personally, but I’ve seen them come and go.  Not elderly or infirm.  Driving, working, healthy looking people.  It appears as though they are doing some sort of home clean out now because there is more junk outside than usual.  Again, having gone through extensive clean outs and renovations I understand that while work is in process, there will be debris, because — it’s a work in progress.  But, the couch and cushions have been out there for again, about a month. I don’t see any evidence of home repairs or renovations going on.  It appears as though someone decided to get some crap out of the house so — they just put it outside. Other large trash items have joined the sofa. These other items could have been put out in the regular trash.  But, for some reason, the residents are just piling it up on and around the couch.

There’s a school bus stop nearby.  Lovely.

These abandoned sofas are like announcements to people, whether they are passing through or coming home.  It gives the appearance of,

“You have crossed over into a bad part of town.”

The Good The Bad and the Ugly

When people come to see me, or drop off my kids, they have to pass by one or both of the sofas. It’s far from inviting.  It actually repels. And it seems that as soon as a rotting sofa is finally removed, another appears.   I remember when we were still in the marital home when it was on the market, as we drove by what is now my neighborhood, my kid said,”I’m not moving over there.”   She didn’t know that I had already purchased my little hoarders home.   I told myself at the time, “I’ll make it nice.”

And I did.

I worked my butt off making our home as nice as I could, but I can’t do anything about the neighbors who allow upholstered furniture to rot outside their homes.

I think there’s a psychological reason why people do this.  There are some people who are  — interior.  Most of their relaxation time is spent indoors.  They only think of their yard, their porch, and front door as something to pass through to get inside.  I guess then it becomes easy to make whatever changes you are making inside the house, and put the debris outside. After all, you’ve gotten it out of the house.  It’s kind of like how an apartment dweller can throw things in a dumpster and go back inside, oblivious as to whether the dumpster is ever emptied.

But still . . .

These couches make me sad.  It feels like people have just given up and don’t care.  And what’s worse?   It’s contagious.  I would never do the couch thing, and I  maintain my yard, but I’ve lost the will to garden or create an outdoor space for entertaining.  I mean, why bother?  I don’t want to sit outside and look at a rotting sofa while roasting marshmallows.   I plan to garden and landscape more this year, to enhance curb appeal, but my heart’s not in it. I confess.

Just Me With . . . plenty of outdoor seating . . . on rotting couches  . . . on the side of the road.

It just irks me.  And it may cost me.

Related:  Piss, Puke, and Porn — My Hoarder’s House

That Hoarder’s Smell — How to Get Rid of It

Goodbye Hoarders

Double Sinks In The Master Bath, Part II

Christmas vacation

I recently had a vacation with the extended family.  We rented a big house during the off-season at a resort area — so cheap. My family took pity on me because I had been unwell lately and because I currently live in a home with only one bathroom that I share with my five kids, though one is away at school.

So even though I don’t have a “Master,” per se  (gag me),  they let me have one of the master bedrooms.  This  meant I had my very own bathroom.

 

Heaven on Earth

My very own bathroom. It was a thing of beauty.  It had a jacuzzi tub and a separate shower, a private water closet and — space! I could dance in my bathroom.  I briefly considered holding some sort of meeting there.  It had more floor space than my current family room has.  Plus, I didn’t have to make an announcement before I showered in case others had to use the bathroom first and I didn’t have to use the bathroom quickly before someone else took a shower.   For a week, I didn’t have to wade my way through acne products on the sink and teen clothes left on the floor.

My glorious bathroom also had double sinks.  I’ve discussed the double sink thing before, at Double Sinks in the Master Bath –Must We Have them, Really?  One of the problematic issues about them being standard in new construction is the fact that not everyone is coupled up.  The sinks are kind of a throw-back to the assumption that the heads of the households — the ones who deserve the best rooms — are always a couple.

Now, I loved having my own bathroom for a week.   I am not complaining.  It was an indulgence I’m sure many have on a daily basis, but for me?  I was living like a queen, albeit temporarily.  Still, I felt slightly silly in this bathroom.  It may have been the double sinks.  This was a bathroom built for two.  Every time I went to wash my hands or brush my teeth or wash my face, it reminded me, ever so subtly,  that I am single, occupying this space meant for a couple.   The suite also had a king sized bed, and I have to admit that, after all these years, I’m still sleeping on “my side of the bed.”

Whatever.

I took turns using first one sink and then the other so that neither one would feel left out.  (That’s my throw-back to having twins. Keep it equal as much as I can, in an effort to keep them out of therapy.) Inexplicably, I also locked the door to the water closet when I was in there.  I guess I didn’t want my non-existent ghost husband to walk in on me when nature called as he breezed in to shave over “his” sink.

From "The Others"  but was her husband real?

From “The Others” but was her husband real?

Oh wait, no one was going to use that other sink.

I was the master of my bathroom domain.

Elaine, from Seinfeld

Elaine, from Seinfeld

Oh well.   I loved having this huge bathroom all to myself for a vacation, but if I had actually purchased a home with double sinks that I’d have to look at day in and out? That would kind of piss me off. Contractors, realtors, HGTV  — take note.

The master bath also came with two sets of towels — I guess for my invisible ghost man.

I used those, too.

Just Me With . . . one shower, one bathtub, one toilet, TWO sinks and a bunch of towels — Just For Me. 

Double Sinks in the Mast Bath — Must We Have Them?  Really? 

An Argument Against the Open Floor Plan

Still Sleeping on My Side of the Bed

Double Sinks in the Master Bath – Must We Have Them? Really?

Double Sinks in the Master Bath

Double Sinks in the Master Bath

Two Sinks: Now standard in new construction for Master Baths.   It’s another “must have” shown on the real estate shows.  Having previously written about the “Open Floor Plan” a commenter suggested I  discuss other popular real estate “must have” amenities.   There are  many, from walk-in closets,  stainless steel appliances, and granite counter tops.    But here I’ll address Two Sinks in the Master Bath.   People just have to have these, according to many of the House Hunters couples on HGTV.   Some of these HGTV couples are so disappointed when the master bath doesn’t have two sinks, it’s a deal-breaker.  By the way, HGTV does a good job of showing same-sex couples on their shows, but the two sink thing seems to be proffered has a heterosexual couple “must have.”  I’ll address it in kind.

From what I understand, these are the reasons why this is so popular:

1.  We can get ready together in the morning! 

2.  I don’t have to deal with his/her mess in the sink, I’ll have my very own sink!  

3.  His and her sinks in the Master Bath means “I’ve Arrived!”     

Yeah, okay.  I get it.  I really do, but I’m not sure that requiring two sinks in the master bath  is the best use of construction dollars or should be a deal-breaker.

1.  We can get ready together in the morning! 

Oh, that’s cute, but think about it.  In this world when everybody has personal devices for everything, when people don’t share cars or phones or computers or even closets, why are high-end houses still designed so that a couple can share a bathroom in the morning?   The whole point, from what I understand, is that couples can both be brushing their teeth or whatever at the same time.  Really?   In a large home, especially a home that is new construction, or one that carries a price tag that starting at over a half a million dollars, or one  where each child, nanny, and guest has his/her own bathroom, why are the husband and wife supposed to brush, rinse, spit, and floss together?  Not to mention pluck, shave, or otherwise groom.  I don’t care what you say, HGTV, but most husbands and wives are not going to openly share their nasal maintenance.    And though I’m not completely sure what men do in the bathroom, I’m reasonably sure I don’t need to see it.

Let’s face it:  regardless of the existence of two sinks, some things will be done behind the closed bathroom door while the spouse is elsewhere — anywhere — but standing at the adjacent sink.

And for those couples who are completely comfortable sharing bathroom activities with each other?  They don’t need two sinks.

2.  I don’t have to deal with his/her mess in the sink.  I’ll have my very own sink!  

Even when couples won’t use the bathroom as the same time, they want their own space.   As I’ve heard repeatedly on HGTV, this breaks down to two concerns:

a.  Women want/need space for all their skin, hair, make-up products.

Carrie's bathroom in Sex and The City

Carrie’s bathroom in Sex and The City

b.  Men leave shaving stubble in the sink, and women don’t like to see it, clean it or use a sink with said shaving stubble.

Dude shaving.  I honestly don't see a problem with seeing this in my bathroom, but I digress . . .

Dude shaving. I honestly don’t see a problem with seeing this in my bathroom, but I digress . . .

Alrighty then.   Having two sinks will create two separate areas for two different kinds of messes, right next to each other. His and her sinks?  His and her mess.

Ew.  (Doesn’t anybody clean?)

I think we can safely say that both a man and a woman have the potential for leaving a mess in the bathroom.  Given  blow drying and flat-ironing of long hair, the skin and make-up products, it seems like the women would be more likely to be the slobs in the bathroom sink area, though on HGTV they are usually the ones to complain.    The complaint about the man’s mess seems to be mostly about shaving stubble.  It appears HGTV women are very put out about seeing shaving stubble in the sink.   Does having two sinks make it better?  Not really.   I doubt that the woman who is really bothered by the sight of beard stubble will be able to enjoy her adjacent sink  within view of said beard stubble.  Again, isn’t somebody going to clean the bathroom?

Anybody?

Having two sinks will only ensure that one is always surrounded by woman’s  mess/stuff and the other will be surrounded by a man’s mess/stuff.

Still, somebody will have to see and wash up next to the other person’s mess — and now there are two sinks to clean — or not.  It’s kind of like the Hoarder who, instead of throwing stuff out, simply rents a storage unit.

But I get it.  It’s a perk.

3.  His and her sinks in the Master Bath means “I’ve Arrived!”   (I really think this is the true reason why couples crave the two sinks.)  

But . . .  

a.  Not everyone is in a couple.

Yes, you’ve arrived, but uh  —  not all adults are coupled up.  Sometimes you arrive all by yourself (pun not intended — well, maybe a little).  It’s not always a his/her, his/his or her/her situation.  Sometimes it’s Just Me . . . heh heh heh.  I remember a scene from the movie “It’s Complicated” where the main character, a divorced woman, was redoing her bathroom and wanted to get rid of the second sink. It was just a daily reminder that she had no partner, which she was okay with, but the sinks apparently were not.    My single sister has a two sink master bathroom that came with her newer construction home.  She uses one sink, and the other holds her curling iron.  Seems a waste.

Two sinks in the Master Bath are just kind of stupid for single people, and a bit insulting.  I can almost see the existence of two sinks being a deal-breaker for a single person.    And if  person becomes single after having insisted on the double sinks?   Might as well tile “Failed Relationship” on the back splash.

b.  Not everyone aspires to be in a couple.

Having a second sink when single might invite a relationship where one is not welcome.   Remember vintage Barney in “How I Met Your Mother”?   When giving Lily the tour of his Fortress of Barnitude, he explained,  “I make it crystal clear to every girl who walks in here that this is not the place to leave a toothbrush, this is not the place to leave a contact lens case, this is a place — to leave.”   I mean, the guy has a king size bed with only a full size blanket and just one pillow.   As to the bathroom, Barney added,  “What? Only one towel?  What? No hair dryer?  You know where I keep that stuff?  Your place.  Beat it.”   Clearly, the Master (or Lady) of the house does not always have or welcome a guest planning to stay long enough to warrant a second sink.   Nope.  As Barney said, sometimes a person wants his or her home to say,  “Our work here is done.”

Barney's Bedroom in

Barney’s Bedroom in “How I Met Your Mother” Season 2. Barney would never stand for two sinks. Never.

The Solution? 

I know I can be a rebel, but I think that what I think people really want is  — wait for it —— their very own bathroom!

Why stop at the sinks?   I mean, if you’re loading down a house with all the must have stuff let’s go all the way —  I’m talking his and her separate, private bathrooms!   In the old days, many of the very wealthy couples had his and her bathrooms.  Let’s extend the royal treatment to suburban McMansions.

New Construction

You hear that, new construction designers?   You wouldn’t necessarily need that much more room, depending on the design and a bit of creativity.  Some of these high end master bedrooms have a separate seating area and his or her walk-in closets.  If there is space for all that, they could design his and her bathrooms, especially in those palatial homes and possibly even in more moderate homes.   It’s funny in these houses with every amenity imaginable and  the cars get their own room and guests have their own suites, can’t the Lady and Lord of the house brush their teeth alone?     And I’d bet it would be a huge selling point.  Huge.

Sunny Von Bulow's private bath, as depicted in the film,

Sunny Von Bulow’s private bath, as depicted in the film, “Reversal of Fortune.” Mr. Von Bulow described it as her sanctuary. She’d spend hours in there, especially after being drugged with insulin . . . but I digress.

Even for singles, we can keep that second bathroom on lock down and not within view, and only a privileged few could earn a key to this “executive washroom.”  It would be a “special guest” bath.  As an added bonus, it would serve a dual function of keeping  our guests the heck out of our stuff.   “No, I’m sorry, honey, you use that bathroom.”  heh heh heh

But I get it.  For most of us regular folk there might not be space for two completely separate baths connected to the master bedroom.

I’ll offer  another, less radical, suggestion.  When remodeling or buying new construction or house shopping, consider having only one sink in the Master Bath,  make the assumption that a couple will not actually be in the bathroom together, or if they are, they are not both using the sink at the same time.   Instead, use the money saved to install a larger, easy to clean counter space, creating an area that can accommodate all the products with great lighting and plenty of mirrors.   Or, better yet,  design personalized storage for all of those products and hair appliances so they can be used and put away (or left out)  while still hot.   And that one sink?  Make it and the  counter easy to wipe clean of the shaving stubble,  you could or even install a sprayer.    (Or get a maid.)

Let’s put a second (or third) sink where it belongs —  in the hall (children’s) bath.  It always amazes me when this is missing in a space that would allow it, especially in homes that are meant to accommodate more than one child.   It’s kids that  brush their teeth together while another small child is sitting on the toilet.   Kids aren’t concerned about modesty, have less products and consequently less need for counter space.   But trust me, you want them washing those grubby hands.  Any preschool teacher or parent will tell you kids tend to wash better and brush teeth longer with a buddy.   So let the kids live dorm style.  Just teach them to clean the sinks, all of them!

Aw, let the kids wash up together!

Aw, let the kids wash up together!

Just Me With . . . no master bath at all, so I’m talking, excuse my expression,  — out of my ass.   We are a family of six sharing one bathroom.  I would love to have another sink — anywhere!

Many thanks to the commenter David Travers, who inspired this post, and to HGTV, a channel that I watch, enjoy, and criticize frequently.

Maybe I’m just jealous.

See also:

Double Sinks in the Master Bath, Part II

An Argument Against the Open Floor Plan

and How to Unclog a Toilet While Under Sedation

An Argument Against the Open Floor Plan

Taking down the wall . . .

On every home makeover show, every real estate show, they talk about how everyone loves the open floor plan.  It’s the new black. Homeowners are forever busting through walls to open the kitchen to the family room and eliminating the dining room altogether.

There are two main reasons why the open floor plan is so so popular:

1.    It is great for entertaining.  People always end up in the kitchen anyway, right?    This allows the cook to be in the kitchen puttering around and interact with guests.

2.   It is great for parents of young children.   It allows the parent to be in the kitchen and still keep an eye on the little ones in the family room.   No more  baby in a playpen or high chair in the kitchen while you make dinner.

Do you see the theme?

STAY IN THE KITCHEN!

The open floor plan negates any reason to actually leave the kitchen.

But there is a third reason:  knocking out walls creates space, or at least an illusion of space within the same square footage.

When you think about it, the open  floor plan has been common in apartments for years. Walk into an apartment and you can see everything except  the bedroom.     It was supposed to be a move up  for an apartment dweller to buy a house and actually have separate rooms.     This new open floor plan  trend has essentially turned high-end palace homes into nothing but super-sized apartments, with a second floor.

Monica and Rachel’s Apartment in Friends

For those of you who don’t have the open floor plan,  before you take out all the walls in your house, and before you feel badly because you have a wall that you can’t take down, consider this:

1.  Your children won’t be toddlers forever.

Children tend to grow. And there will come a time where you don’t want to and don’t have to watch every move they make.

2.  Yes, you can see your toddlers, but your toddlers can see you, too.

My husband and I used to go into the laundry room to shove a snack into our faces so that the babies wouldn’t see and start wailing for some.  Sometimes, I’d drop down behind the island like I’d heard sudden gunfire in order to have a cookie.

3.  You can see your school-age, tween and teen kids, but they can see you, too.

With an open floor plan, you can  forget coming down to sneak a snack over the counter in your jammies late at night, or reading the paper at the kitchen counter/table in the morning before your shower. There’s nothing like hearing,   “Hi. Mrs.  Peterson!”  when you’re bra-less in a  vintage tee and boxers drinking coffee in your kitchen.   And if you dare talk on the phone while cooking or cleaning, you will be shushed by someone — or perhaps worse, a child  will be listening in on every word.    And it is a truism, a simple fact of life, that as kids grow, parents spend a fair amount of time hiding from them.    The open floor plan is antithetical to the natural course of child-rearing in this respect.

4.  Your kitchen must always be spotless . . .

There’s no door to close.  When unexpected guests pop in — yours or your children’s — and you haven’t unloaded and reloaded your dishwasher — everyone can see it.  Suddenly you’re a slob.  The rest of your house could be spotless, but under these floor plans, no one ever sees the rest of your house.

5.   Your family (TV)  room includes a kitchen– a  noisy, smelly kitchen.

Imagine sitting down in a darkened room, ready to watch a great emotional or talky movie and — oh hello, there’s your kid or spouse or whatever, in the kitchen, talking on the phone, repeatedly opening the fridge, making bacon, arguing with someone. Go ahead and click pause, because you can’t hear whatever George Clooney is saying, not that you need to . . . . but I  digress. Your quiet moment has been ruined.

6. Children’s Programming/Teen programming/Sports/News — Anything you don’t want to watch at any given time.

Your little kid is watching Dora. Again, and again, and again. You can’t get away from it.  iCarly I get it, but I’ve had enough.  People are enjoying the big game, snacking, yelling at the screen, having a good old time.  You are wiping the counter after having loaded the dishwasher and setting out food for them. Worse, you can’t even mutter to yourself or roll your eyes at the unfairness of it all, because you are on display.

Essentially, the open floor plan allows you to be in the kitchen and watch — other people watch TV.   Humph.

7.  “Oh my gosh I dropped the chicken!”

In a perfect world, no one would know.  Open floor plan?  Well, it’ll be tweeted in minutes.

8.  When entertaining, sometimes you need a minute.

The Mary Tyler Moore Show: Guests in the next room are expecting dinner; Mary and Rhoda panic in the kitchen because they have no food.

Your mother-in-law is driving you crazy, your boss is bored, your husband/wife is saying something he/she shouldn’t, you need yet another drink, you just said something really, really stupid.  With an open floor plan, THERE’S NO PLACE TO GO!!!    I love all the classic  TV shows where people could say, “Can I see you in the kitchen”  or “I’m going to check on the food,”  followed quickly by, “I’ll help you.”    (This is all code for “We need to talk.” )  With an open floor plan I guess you have to hide in the bathroom, and that’s just plain icky.

How many times did characters in Frasier run off to the kitchen to plot against some misunderstanding happening in the living room?

One big room is fine, it can even be intimate when you are alone or coupled up.  But once there are people of different ages,  interests and responsibilities, well let’s just say that all this open living can be  downright oppressive.

I speak from experience.

I knocked out a kitchen wall in my  old house and built a family room addition. Instead of looking out  my  kitchen window and seeing  trees, I created a view of  my family room.  I had young children at the time.  I fell for the “I can be in the kitchen and see the kids”   trap.  Well, the children grew, the husband left, and I  downsized  to a much smaller  fixer-upper  home.

When it was time to do the kitchen, the contractor asked,

“You gonna knock out this wall?”

I said, “No.  I want my wall.   I need my wall.”

Truth is, I need some division in my life.

Sometimes I  watch a little TV  or listen to music while cleaning or cooking.  Sometimes I sit at the kitchen table on my laptop or  the phone while my kids are in the family room watching something that literally makes me ill.  I’ve even been known to channel my inner Beyoncé and dance to my heart’s content in my kitchen. With my wall intact, I can be unseen but close by, and still opt in or out of  the children’s  entertainment at will.

It’s the little things . . .  Sometimes a wall  is a good little thing.

Just Me With . . . a divided floor plan and a bit of,  well  — if not sanity —  at least a bit of privacy.

See also:

My Refrigerator Broke. Do I Really New A Fancy New Stainless Steel New One?

Double Sinks in The Master Bath — Must We Have Them?  Really? 

Piss, Puke, and Porn — my new old house.

A Rat In My House

Suck This! Mr. Dyson

Toilet or Kitchen Sink — Who Can Tell? 

My Panty Drawer, Your Panty Drawer — My Adventures in Home Staging and Carpet Installation

How to Get Rid of That Hoarder’s Smell

My Panty Drawer/Your Panty Drawer — My Adventure in Home Staging and Carpet Installation

I’ve talked about the crap I’ve had to deal with in my new house, well not crap, piss, actually, see Piss, Puke and Porn, but my old house had been a fixer upper, too.   There were a lot of jobs that didn’t get finished, what with kids that started coming two at a time and then the husband walking out and all.   But I had decided to sell and I had to do cosmetic changes quickly to make the house more appealing.

I needed to get carpet on the stairway and upstairs hallway.   Not a job I could do myself.   Even the most avid DIY-ers will call in the pros for carpet installation, especially stairs.   So I got a quote from one of those next day installation companies since the house was already on the market and I needed a quick turnaround.   Didn’t like the sales guy that came by hours late — said he couldn’t find my house and when he did, there were no cars in the driveway so he thought I was out.   Wrong.  But again, I needed a quick turnaround so I went ahead and booked a time  for neutral colored carpet to be installed next day.

For staging purposes,  I had already moved one of my dressers from my bedroom to another room to make my bedroom appear larger.   (This was a big house , but it was an old house so we didn’t have the huge walk in closets, etc., just a lot of  rooms).  So my dresser, containing my bras and panties and pajamas, was in the room (formerly and traditionally, a nursery) adjacent to the master bedroom at the top of the stairs.  I sometimes keep important documents in my panty drawer (anyone else do that?) so I had been looking in there for a credit card I don’t usually use to pay for the carpet.   I admit that  I may have left the drawer slightly ajar — cracked, but not completely open.

Sitting with the supervisor downstairs I completed the paperwork and made the down payment.   While we were doing this the workers came in to prepare for installation.     This much must be understood:   this was a hallway carpet installation, the previous carpet had already been removed.   In other words, there was no furniture to move out of the way and no bedrooms were getting new carpet.    After the paperwork was finalized, I checked on the workers.

I walked upstairs to find a man in the extra room with his hand in the now open underwear drawer,  gazing at and  fingering my panties. My good, lace,  hoping I’ll get lucky  — underpants.   Ew.   (Ladies, you just crossed you legs, didn’t you?)  As soon as he saw me he dropped them, removed his hand,  looking like a kid caught with his hand in the candy jar — or more accurately — looking like a man caught with his  hand  in my panty drawer!

Nothing was missing from my drawer.  But in my mind my panties would never be the same.  I complained to the supervisor who spoke to the workers — in Spanish.   I don’t speak Spanish.   I complained to the corporate offices in writing.  I got a call saying that they had investigated and  the worker said the drawer probably fell open while they were moving furniture, and of course I countered,

THE WORKERS DIDN’T HAVE TO MOVE ANY FURNITURE TO INSTALL HALLWAY CARPET!   THEY HAD NO TO REASON TO BE IN THAT ROOM AT ALL, LET ALONE IN MY UNDERWEAR DRAWER!  

Now,  I understand that any company can get a bad worker, but not only did they offer me nothing for my experience, but I even got the subsequent follow-up marketing calls, you know, the “How did you like our service?” calls.   It was  funny, because I would calmly respond,  “The carpet is fine, but one of your workers played with my panties and that kinda of ruined it for me.   So, no, I can’t recommend your company to anyone.”  Ha!  Oh, the stutters I would get from the unknowing telemarketer!!!     But really, what kind of company would keep me on the call list after I’d complained in writing?

This is a national carpet company — and to this day when I hear their ads with their catchy jingle, I sing a little ditty — “They’ll install carpet and feel up your panties — today.”

Just Me With . . . panties that get more action than I do.

Craigslist Angels — One Man’s Trash is Another Man’s Treasure

My house wasn’t this grand, but it was somewhat similar.

My Marital Home was  large Victorian fixer-upper still in progress.  I  had accumulated a lot of  children and stuff over my years there.   One of my forms of therapy has always been to get rid of things and rearrange furniture (I know, a little weird) .  Consequently  I’d been cleaning crap out with a vengeance after my husband left (so much so he thought I was moving way before I even thought about it).

When the real move was on the horizon, I was faced with moving from this  big house to my new little project where Piss Man and his GF were living  (See Piss, Puke and Porn).    So I basically decreased our belongings by — my guess — around two/thirds . . .   Mind you the kid count was remaining the same and they were/are growing by the minute and although some days I’d like to sell them, I’m aware that generally this is frowned upon.  Consequently, other stuff had to go.

Since I’m a purger by nature I drop by Goodwill often; they know me (even got hit on there).  But since I was already doing this massive move by myself, including getting the Marital Home ready for sale and fixing up the new old hoarder’s house, I was quickly tiring of schlepping my stuff to Goodwill.  I also tired of selling individual items, you know, meeting strangers at inconvenient times, etc. to maybe or maybe not make a sale.  (Sounds a little like dating, but I digress.)  I’ve never had luck having yard sales.   So I started posting things for free.

We’ve all seen those ads, “Free Stuff”  “Moving” etc.  Well, I became one of those people.    I decided to give away everything I could on one beautiful weekend.  I took pictures,  posted them on Craigslist and said FREE — come get it . . . first come, first served.

When living in a smaller space you don’t have the luxury to store certain things, one of them being holiday decorations.   I’d already gotten rid of much of that stuff, but I was ready to let go of  almost everything else.  I told myself, and I was right, that I probably wouldn’t miss it  and if I wanted more decorations later I’d  start fresh.

My kids’ babysitter (now a good, good friend) had given them these beautiful angel decorations — you know the kind with the velvet gown and fur and whatnot — I had four of them for the girls and she’d given the boy  a big nutcracker (heh heh).   The angels had looked beautiful in my formal dining room when I had my Christmas sing-along parties.   But, that life was . . . over.   Still, even for me,  it is a bit harder to get rid of items that were thoughtful gifts from a loved one–  so I struggled a bit.

I knew I couldn’t store the angels and I knew that in the new old house I wouldn’t have a place to display them at Christmas  . . . so . . .  I took a picture of the kids’ pretty angels, posted it on Craigslist and put them out on the street, convincing myself that my friend would understand.  It felt kinda like giving away my four girls, except  my girls  aren’t  always angels  . . . but I digress.

Craigslist Angels

Christmas Angels

After posting, I got an email right away from a guy wanting to know if I still had them.  I checked outside and they were still there.  He asked me to hold them until he could get to my house.

Alrighty.

I mean, they were pretty, but I didn’t know they’d be hot property  — in June.   I moved them to a more secluded place and told him where he could find them.   He came and got them right away.  I never saw him.

Cool,”  I thought,  “My stuff  is going.”  It’s amazing how you can’t sell something for a dollar but if you offer it for free —  it’s gone.

A couple of hours later I got an email from the man who took the angels.   He  thanked me for the them, telling me that they were for his mother who was going through Cancer treatments and having a pretty rough time.   She didn’t get out much, he said, hardly ever.  But when she saw the picture of my Christmas angels she  wanted them so badly that she rode with him to get them.

He said those angels made her so happy. He was thrilled to be able to make her smile.

He just wanted to let me know how much I’d done for the both of them.

I almost cried.  I’m lying, I did cry.

Oh wait, it’s Just Me With . . . tears in my eyes . . . again.

For what happened when I prepared the Marital Home for sale, see My Panty Drawer/Your Panty Drawer

For my purging of marriage related material, see:

My Wedding Album, Time to Reduce It — Perhaps by Fire

Wedding Leftovers — What To Do With The Dress?

and for what I wish would happen with Craigslist, see,  A Craigslist Fantasy.

 

 

Toilet or Kitchen Sink — Who Can Tell?

As I noted in Piss, Puke and Porn after I bought  my new old house I allowed the prior owners to rent it back from me for a number of months while my marital home was on the market.  During this time I worked mostly on the outside of the house.

It needed it.

I saw this home and had to have it.  I'm crazy that way.

I saw this home and had to have it. I’m crazy that way.

When it got closer to move-in time I did do some work/planning inside the house.

It needed it.

From the HP 2235

The Kitchen

One fine day I was in the kitchen measuring, trying to come up with a plan to remodel the kitchen which, again, was nasty –I mean  it had stained, smelly carpet —  IN THE KITCHEN!   Once white ceiling tiles which were  brown from cigarette smoke and water damage,  and the kitchen boasted a lovely exposed toilet pipe,  etc.  But I was financially challenged and wasn’t sure how I was going to be able to afford all the home renovations needed at one time.   I briefly considered trying to live with the kitchen “as is’ for a while.   (Of course, after removing the carpet and massive cleaning and disinfecting.)

Makes you want to cook, right?

During the rental period, the matriarch of the family, bless her heart, had become ill.   She was staying in a hospital bed in the front room (the hallway was too small to get a bed upstairs).   Her common law daughter-in-law (the one living upstairs with Piss Man) was her primary caretaker.   See  What Happened In My House?  Murder?   The daughter-in-law seemed to want to befriend me.   I can talk to anybody, really, so we were chatting it up.  Mind you, this was before the discovery of The Piss Collection.

But then something happened.

Piss Man’s Girlfriend had gone to check on the Matriarch.   I stayed in the kitchen, pondering — what to do with this mess?   Then, Piss Man’s Girlfriend returned with a full  bed pan and proceeded to empty it —  into the kitchen sinkINTO THE KITCHEN SINK !!!!

EWWWWWWW!

She did this right in front of me!!!

My hopes of my family using the existing kitchen for a while and thus staggering the home renovations were dashed, or should I say splashed down the kitchen sink.  A kitchen sink currently being used and surrounded by dishes and food.

Ew.

When the family  moved out  of my new old house, the entire kitchen — including the kitchen sink — was demolished by a friend and I — within days.   We lived for four months with no kitchen at all.   But I’d rather have no kitchen at all than —-

Just Me With . . . The Ever Popular “Toilet — Kitchen Sink Combination.”

Related:   What Happened in My House, Murder? 

and  That Hoarders Smell

and Exhumation by Accident — Be Careful What You Dig For 

Piss, Puke, and Porn

This is not my house, but it’s similar to mine.

Piss, Puke and Porn.   Ahhh, my new house.   Just Me and the Kids  had been living in the very large marital home since the Husband moved out.  I couldn’t afford it.  I couldn’t take care of it.   But I have five big kids so it’s not like I could hole up in a one bedroom apartment. Plus,  the kids and I loved their schools and I did not want them to have to change, for academic and emotional reasons.   So, I bought this little house because I could make the bedrooms work and my kids could go to the same schools.   But the house was in deplorable condition (which is how I could afford it).   The people living there had owned the house for generations but had done no maintenance.   Plus, they were sick and poor.   The house looked like it should have been condemned.  Actually the back part of it was condemned and had to be demolished.

I couldn’t even tell the kids about the house because it looked so bad it would have been too traumatic for them.   We drove by it every day and the kids had no idea.   The prior owners rented it back from me for 6 months and I worked on the outside of it when the kids were in school so that it wouldn’t look so bad.

Meanwhile, the marital home finally sold.   I would have two weeks from the time the prior owners/renters left the new old house before I had to move  the kids and I there.   The prior owners were heavy smokers, and I say this with no judgment, just the facts — nasty.     I knew that I would be undertaking an extreme makeover but . . .

I get that it was a tough move for the prior owners.  Their family had lived there for over 60 years.   I stopped by on move out night and they asked if they could leave a couple of boxes to pick up the next day.   Sure, I said, because I’m nice that way.   But when I went over there the next day and could see what was left in broad daylight, it made me sick.

These people kept cats but did not take care of them.   They left me litter boxes with cat poop and no kitty litter.   The boxes merely had newspaper lining the bottom of the pan.   They also left used wet cat food cans.   This was late Spring, people.   Temps were in the 80’s and rising.  Also, there was cat poop that didn’t make the cat box at all.   They had apparently kept a cat locked up in what would become my room.   The cat had yacked numerous times and they hadn’t cleaned it up.   It took a paint scraper to get it up the big chunks and later a full sanding of the hardwood floors.  See, That Hoarders Smell   Not to mention the cat urine which had soaked into the floors and the wet cat food in there  — the smell was indescribable.

But the third floor attic bedroom was even worse.    A grown man (like in his 40’s)  and his girlfriend had lived up there — like hoarders.  The side of the attic which was used for “storage” had clothes and debris thrown over there, not in boxes, not in bags, and another cat had free rein up there.   Think about it.   The storage area was nothing but a big litter box.

Do you see the cat?

Anyway, after the move out there were some boxes and debris left there.  Well, okay, I thought, they said they’d leave some things and be back to get them.  But I had to inspect the property anyway and start to clean.   I had to.

This is what I found:   bags of trash, well, actually garbage, including used tissues and vintage porn with sticky pages,   more cat poop and litter boxes without litter,  an adult diaper (used), little green baggies (which I’m told was crack),   and, 2-liter soda bottles — a lot of them strewn about, in boxes, under debris, etc.   These soda bottles were not empty —  but no soda, either  —

I found approximately fifty 2 liter bottles of HUMAN PISS!

The Piss Collection

Part Of The Piss Collection

No wonder the house smelled so bad!   Understand that the bathroom was always in working order.  Understand that the guy who lived up there, though collecting disability, was not immobile —  he could walk,  climb stairs, etc.  and was not developmentally disabled to the point that he was incontinent.   In other words,  he was capable of carrying his lazy ass to the bathroom and knew that’s where people are supposed to urinate!    Understand also that  he had a girlfriend who must have allowed this!!!!  (What kind of woman would . . . ??????)   Let me say it again — 50 bottles of human piss — in my new house.   I knew I’d have to do major renovations, but piss  removal?

Thank goodness the kids weren’t with me when I made this discovery.  Even my therapist said she’d never heard of anything like this.  (This was before the show Hoarders was so popular.)    I stopped looking through stuff.  My daughters’ future bedroom was a toilet, literally.   And people, this was an attic bedroom — in June!   It was ten degrees hotter up there than outside.    It was nauseating.   Truly.  And I was going to move my kids in this house in a matter of days.  Looking back on it I still shudder.  Yeah, I’ve been through some crap . . . and piss.

Just Me With . . .  50 Bottles of Piss in My House, 50  Bottles of Piss . . .

For another urine story, see “Toilet or Kitchen Sink — Who Can Tell?