Tag Archives: weight

Confessions of a Skinny Mom

For my 100th post, I figured I’d write about the one thing I hate to admit.   Who am I kidding, there are plenty of things I hate to admit.  This one, however, is a bit, well . . .  difficult.

I danced around it on my Angela Jolie Post, my Adultery Diet Post and I described some of the effects of it with We Thought You Were Dead, Mommy — Almost F*cked to Death and the Twilight Zone posts  but I never really say it.  Even here and now within the constraints of a blog post I’m not going into great detail, not in one post anyway.  Plus, posts are supposed to be short, right?  I can only write so much here.  (Thank goodness.)

There have probably been seeds of it implanted in me from my childhood, and in young adult life when I did a miniscule about of modeling.  Years later  I lost a lot of weight after my children were born, initially as a result of breastfeeding multiples and later from sheer exhaustion. See Fertile Myrtle.

But somewhere in my mind I have had this fear of “getting fat.”

Then there was the negative reinforcement of the world, it seems, when people said,

“You don’t look like you have five kids . . . “

It is meant as a compliment.  But it probably got my psyche thinking, “What if I didn’t look like this?

So, after the children,  I kept busy (as if I had a choice with all those kids), watched how much I ate, and stayed slim. And I’d pretty much given my body to my husband, “Sex On Demand“.

Maybe I was still feeling vulnerable from my his stupid  brief affair with a much younger woman.

Maybe,” I thought, “I can’t get younger, but I can make sure I don’t get fat.”  I don’t know.

Maybe I felt out of control because I suddenly had so many children and was completely overwhelmed yet somehow needed to make it look effortless.  The Superwoman Syndrome.

So I stayed slim, but not yet dangerously so.  I got some new clothes, highlights in my hair and was trying to give myself a home makeover — the new me —  still fabulous after five kids, who were finally out of the diaper, toddler, and preschool grind.  I could see a light at the end of the tunnel.  Maybe we’d be able to leave the house soon? 

But then . . .  my husband left me . . .

. . . and I pretty much stopped eating.

Ironically his love interest at that time was younger and  significantly heavier than me.  My being thin and sexually available was ultimately unsuccessful.  Maybe I just should have become an incredible cook . . . but I digress . . .

At first I was too devastated to eat, and that, simply, continued.

I never used laxatives, or induced vomiting.  (I absolutely hate throwing up).  I just  stopped eating, or really ate just enough to keep from falling over.  I had a lot of other “behaviors” — they call them.  Whatever, I don’t want to think about it now.  Though it never got as bad as those horrifying pictures one sees on the internet,  I admit  it makes me uncomfortable to look at pictures of myself during my worst times . . . and I have destroyed most of them.

I was a bit like Emily in The Devil Wears Prada, except not nearly as glamorous.

“Well, I don’t eat anything and when I feel like I’m about to faint I eat a cube of cheese.” The Devil Wear Prada

I was in the throes of a deep, deep depression.  But I had children, so I continued doing what I had to do for the most part, except . . . I failed to nourish myself.  Or, I nourished myself just enough to continue to take care of the children, short-term.

Was it a cry for help or a form of suicide when suicide was not an option?

Funny thing happens when you don’t eat much or often,when you do eat you are rewarded with pain and nausea.  Hardly incentive for a person who was crying all day long anyway.     So I ate just enough to function, but my resistance was down, physical strength drained and when I started having dizziness and heart palpitations and losing my hair and a couple of hospitalizations and a blood transfusion later?  Well, perhaps there was a problem.   (Ya think?)  Not to mention my historically unhealthy relationship with my estranged husband, see My High School Self,  and the crap I was dealing with when he left.   It was a rough time.  Call me Forrest Gump, but that’s all I have to say about that —  now, anyway.

They say I suffer(ed) from Anorexia.

I actually don’t feel like talking about this stuff.  I mean, I’m hardly the face of —- gulp — an eating disorder.  I’m an adult  woman of color who has been diagnosed with  a disease whose poster child is the face of a 14-year-old white girl. The stereotype for me is either the big mama in the kitchen or the strong, sassy and proud single mother.   Well, I was/am neither.   Food and cooking holds no interest for me and I did not choose, nor do I wave the banner of my suddenly single mother situation, it’s just something I have to deal with.

No matter, “Anorexia”  is in my medical charts, I have been referred to  and evaluated by a facility for eating disorders who determined that because of my family obligations, I should be treated privately.   Whatever.  I don’t feel like discussing it right now.  Wait, did I already say that?  It’s too much for a blog post, anyway, right?  (Thank goodness).

Long, painful, story short, I’m so much better now.  Therapy, medications for depression and medications for my chronic stomach ailments caused by my poor eating habits have helped tremendously.  Though I’m off the daily anti-depressants now, see Getting Off The Meds,  I’ve found that changing my lifestyle and removing triggers — as much as I can — have helped tremendously also.    So I eat now,  not always well and not with enjoyment, but regularly.  I’m at a good weight, or so I’m told —  I never look.   People tell me I look great.  (People in the know are careful not to exclaim that I’ve gained weight.)   To look at me now, no one would know of my “issues.”   Still, when I am down or stressed, I don’t eat.  And sometimes,  I just forget.    It’s probably something I have to watch for a long time, maybe forever.  But whatever.  I am much healthier than I was, which is the most important.

Just Me With . . . well, they say it was anorexia. They say.

Humph.

P.S.  This may be the first post I delete.

Before I get beat up in the comments because I’m a mom and have to take care of myself for my kids, etc. , know that this just skims the surface (I mean people write whole books on this stuff), that I love my children and have worked my behind off for them, have tried to protect them and have provided a good home (a good part of which I built myself), that even mothers can go through a bad time, having children does not make one immune.   I’ve learned that I have to feel good about me. Period. The rest will/has to come from that.

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On Angelina Jolie – At Least No One Can Say She “Got Fat”

Much has been made of Angelina Jolie’s small frame as she worked the red carpet and stage at this year’s Academy Awards.

She is thin. I’m no expert, and I’ve never seen her in person, but to me she seems almost dangerously thin.  But again, I’m not her doctor.  I don’t know.  She’s a gorgeous woman, by normal people standards and by Hollywood standards? — she’s still gorgeous, but she’s skinny. No doubt, she’s skinny, even by Hollywood standards.

However, let’s step back a minute and take a quick look of the Psyche of an American woman, a movie star mother, no less.

Angelina is in her thirties and has, what, a gazillion kids?  Some adopted but some to which she has given birth.  She is in a relationship with a movie star, a sex symbol.  She herself is a movie star. She’s got to keep up appearances.  Really, it’s part of her job.  The camera doesn’t lie, except that it, I’m told, adds ten to fifteen pounds and magnifies every line and wrinkle.

Angelina is a mother and getting older every day in an industry that worships youth and chases perfection.  Women naturally gain a few pounds over the years, a medical fact to which I have no citation. Also, pregnancy and childbirth can wreak havoc on the body.  I’ve had children.  This is something I know about.   Some changes are publicly visible, some not.  Some changes are  temporary, some not.  Yet despite these truisms, Hollywood stars are often paid to show the world that having children does not change a body at all.  “Here, let me pose in a bikini after having twins.” (Jennifer Lopez and Mariah Carey).   It becomes a race as to how fast a bare midriff can be publicized after childbirth.

Pink

Pink, showing off her post-baby abs.

But that’s Hollywood, folks.  So given these biological strikes (age and childbirth) against women who strive to maintain their high school look, it’s no wonder that it can cause some kind of weight loss hysteria.

And speaking of high school, ladies, think back to your last high school reunion, your  Ex’s new woman or your Ex-Best friend.   I hate to say it but to many of us, the best revenge against a woman and the sweetest music to our ears is to hear that so and so has “gotten fat.”    (Gasp)  Or ladies, after your man dumps you for the younger, skinnier version of you, many silently think, “Just wait until she drops a couple of kids and gets fat.”   Men do it too, whispering to their slim current girlfriend after seeing an Ex who has put on a few pounds, “Whoa, I dodged that bullet.”

What if you are that girl who stole somebody’s boyfriend or husband,  or whose looks are often envied by other women– it may seem that the world wants to bring you down by seeing you “get fat.”

So, what can a woman do?  We stay thin if we can, and get even thinner.   That way, no matter what, nobody can say we “got fat.”

But does this apply to Angelina Jolie, a freaking beautiful movie star?  I say hell yeah.  I think she personifies what women go through daily and over the years.  We are not supposed to change.  We are never supposed to change, except maybe if we lose weight.

Even if you are Angelina Jolie with Brad Pitt on your arm, one might ask? Hell, yeah, I say, Hell yeah.

Angelina has it rough, I say.   She’s beautiful —  but because of her job, her public persona, she simply can’t “get fat” — and in her industry, “fat” means size 6, or 4.    Plus, she’s the girl who got (stole?) Brad Pitt from the beloved ex-wife Jennifer Aniston.  Now Angelina has all these kids,  she can’t possibly get fat, then she’d no longer be the sexy siren, the other woman.  She can’t possibly be the frumpy mom while slim, healthy, and free Jennifer Aniston is out there because in “Girl Wars” this would appear to be a loss. (And I know how ridiculous this may sound, but on some level I believe it happens, ridiculous or not).   No, gaining weight is not an option for poor Angelina.  She has to be thin.  And, I guess, thinner.  Unnaturally (for a mother and woman in her mid-thirties) thin.  Still,  my  guess is that she’s naturally slim and smaller proportioned anyway, but society may generate extra pressure to go beyond that.

It’s sad, but sometimes, as a woman, it seems that regardless of our accomplishments, all we can do is “not get fat.”  If we got the guy and the kids, remaining thin and/or becoming even thinner becomes the only guns in the arsenal of an adult woman.  We can’t control our age, once married we can’t collect men, and once we become mothers so many other things get out of our control —  but we can control our weight, or at least try to.  And people make millions off of our desire to do so.

So if I  could peak inside Angelina Jolie’s mind, I could hear her saying:

Yes I’m still the same size.

Yes, I have many children but I’m still thin. I’m still cool. I’m still sexy. I can still play a non-maternal female protagonist.

So take that, Jennifer Aniston, Hollywood, and stereotypical “normal” Size 12 thirty-something women everywhere. I have it all and  I’m still thin.  I’m so damn thin.  And here’s my leg: 

I ain’t mad at her. To quote Chris Rock, “I’m not gonna say it’s right, but I understand.”  Sometimes it’s hard to be a woman. (Insert country twang here.) I just hope Angelina is healthy, appearances aside.  I also hope that girls and women don’t starve themselves to be as thin as Angelina Jolie.  I also hope that, as a whole, we can learn to accept that keeping or gaining a few pounds over the years is not evidence of failure in life, or conversely, that being as thin as possible is not proof of success.

And I just want to tell Miss Jolie — woman to woman,

“Psst, if you become too thin, it will make you look older, Angelina, and it can cause osteoporosis.  Just remember that and take your Vitamin C. Your acting, producing and directing chops will be wasted if you waste away to nothing.  And if you become a hunch-back old lady before your time, the plum roles will pass you by anyway.  Have some broccoli.”

Just Me With . . . my right leg and my two cents, though nobody asked.

See Related Posts:  “Confessions of a Skinny Mom” and “The Adultery Diet