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Tales from The Bar Exam

I have always prided myself on my test preparation and test taking abilities.   Not just knowing the material, but the little things that help with preparedness, like getting on a sleep schedule that coincides with the testing hours, eating brain and energy foods, avoiding things that cause stress, dressing in comfortable clothes, mapping out and timing the route to the test location, even listening to Mozart!   Then there’s the superstitions:   I firmly believe that sleeping with books under my pillow or next to my bed helps.  I don’t care what anyone thinks about that.  I believe it.

The bar exam is one  pretty big test, at least two full days, depending on your state.  Accordingly, one must be prepared and ironically, having graduated from law school has little to do with being prepared for the bar exam.    There is a period of two and a half months of bar exam study  for would be lawyers.    In my infinite arrogance, I decided that unlike EVERYONE else, I would not pay for and take the bar exam prep course.   My thoughts were, it is stressful to be around anxious pre-lawyers all day,  the course itself is ridiculously expensive.  Plus, what do the courses do?  They give out materials, go over them, teach and practice test taking strategies and offer  practice tests.  I can do this myself, I thought.    I have always (until now . . . but I digress . . .)  been extremely disciplined.  I credit my musical training for this.   I don’t need a class to give me daily study structure.   I can, all by myself, put myself on a study and practice test schedule, every day for eight hours a day, plus a couple more hours at night.    I truly thought I would do better by myself.  I had never taken a prep course for any of the other standardized tests I’d taken, why start now?  Plus, I  resented the way in which the companies that sponsor these bar prep courses (not law schools) profited from the insecurities of pre-lawyers.   These companies know that we have to pass the test and we would do almost anything to pass the test.   No one wants the embarrassment of failing. No one wants to take it more than once.   One Tweeter @CriticalA aptly noted:  “”I’d rather suck Satan’s d*ck than take the bar exam again.”    That pretty much sums it up.

So partly out of arrogance, taking a stand against corporate greed, and, well,  I had no money, I decided:   No, I’m not going to do it.  I will buy the books, but I will not take the course.

Not one other person I knew made that choice.

But it was all good.  I did put myself on a schedule.  I never missed a day of studying, except for the Rat In My House incident, all went well.   I felt prepared, ready.   Mine was a two-day test.  The first multiple choice, the second essay.  If  the test taker  scores high enough on the first day, the second day is less important, so most of the prep courses and study focused on the first day of testing.  I prepared for both.

As planned, a week before the test I put myself on test schedule for sleeping and eating.   I was well rested.  I actually felt good.  I had passed my practice exams well within the allotted time.  I was ready.  Nervous, but ready.

Day One

On test day, I successfully avoided my stressors, got a good seat.  And . . . go!!!!

At some point during the exam, however, I apparently decided that it was time to take a nap.  

A nap!!!!  I freaking fell asleep.  I fell asleep on the bar exam.  I freaking fell asleep on the bar exam.  There was no reason for this.    I was well rested, nourished.  All I can think is that my mind had been so focused on getting ready, that when the day finally came, my brain said — “Okay, I’m done now” and checked out.

I don’t know how long I was out.   I woke up with about a half hour left and a lot more than a half hour of questions to answer.  I wanted to die.    I finished when they called time, but not with well thought out answers and with no time to spare.  I’d always had time to spare in my practice tests.  But then again during my practice tests — I WAS AWAKE!!!!!!!

CRAP!!!!!!

According to my test taking strategies, I must not discuss this with anyone.  I must only go home, eat, rest and sleep in order to be ready for Day Two.  But since I FELL ASLEEP  on Day One, Day Two became much more important, I had to ace it.

I put myself in denial and robotically followed my plan.  I spoke to no one, except my husband, only out of necessity.

The Dreaded Blue Book

Day Two 

I always liked  law school essay tests, but since I HAD FALLEN ASLEEP on the previous day’s multiple choice test, I had to do more than “like” these essays on day two.   I had to excel.   Engaged in my test taking mode,   I scanned the essay questions.   There was one that I absolutely did not know that answer to, I would still answer it, of course, but it would take some reasoning.  No need to panic.  And as I recall there was another that was a bit difficult as well, but at least I knew the answer, though the reasoning might be tricky.  But I did what has always worked for me, I knocked out the easiest ones first, to conserve time for the harder ones later.

In the end, I finished in time, actually with a little time to spare, proofread my answers and tried to put the whole experience behind me.   But on the way home  I realized —-  to my horror:

I’d answered the one question I was initially concerned about but I’d  FORGOTTEN  TO GO BACK AND ANSWER THE OTHER ONE!!!

I HAD NOT ANSWERED ONE OF THE REQUIRED ESSAY QUESTIONS ON THE BAR EXAM!!!!!!!!!!!

For the second time in two days, I wanted to die.

Let’s  recap, shall we?     I didn’t take the bar exam prep course that everyone else took,  I fell asleep on Day One of testing, and I simply neglected to answer a full essay question on Day Two.   It wasn’t good.  Not good at all.

If you don’t know,   there is a four-month wait between the date the exam is taken and when the results are published.  It was a long-ass four months.   By this time,  I was working in a prestigious federal clerkship with an  snobbish double ivy league golden boy son-of-a- judge.  When results day came  the snobbish double ivy league golden boy son-of-a- judge  and I decided that instead of participating in the tradition of  walking to the state courthouse with co-workers or friends to publicly read the results,   we would call the designated a hot line at the State Bar.  Good.  I figured that if  I’d failed the exam my embarrassment would be in front of  the snobbish double ivy league golden boy son-of-a- judge  and no one else.   That would hurt my ego, but it would be better than  public humiliation and the long walk back.

Snobbish double ivy league golden boy son-of-a- judge and I  called the hotline.   He entered his identification number and got word of  his Passing  score.  He  handed  the phone to me.  My head was spinning:  Why was I so arrogant?  Why didn’t I take the course? Why did I fall asleep? Why did I decide part of the exam was optional? Why can’t I just lay down and die???????  I  entered  in my identification number, waited, then  . . .

I PASSED!!!!!

Despite it all, I had passed.  I had passed.  I had passed.  Damn, I must have done something good.

(Yes, I see the typo in the image text, my apologies, it’ll have to do for now.)

Just Me With . . . the ability to say . . . I passed the bar exam in my sleep.

And here’s a bonus, much to the utter shock and dismay of  my  snobbish double ivy league golden boy son-of-a- judge  co-clerk, not only had I passed, but my numerical score was . . . wait for it  . . . higher than his.   (I didn’t say a word, on the outside.)

And  here’s yet another  bonus.  Years later, I ran into my  snobbish double ivy league golden boy son-of-a- judge co-clerk, who actually gained some humility over the years and apologized to me for his arrogance (which is beyond the scope of this post).   Then he started telling me how busy he and his wife were:

Him:   “You’ll never believe it!  I have twin girls!  Yeah, it’s crazy!”

Me:    “Really?  Twin girls, huh?  Wow.   Crazy.   You  have . . .  just . . . one  . . . set of twin girls?” .  . .    wait for it . . .   “I have two.”

We had a good old laugh about that.

Him:  “You always manage to get me, don’t you?   I guess I’d better just shut up.”

(You know that’s right.  Ha!)

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The Night I Became Cinderella — A College Story

Cinderella

If you’ve read My High School Self, you know I had a very serious boyfriend in high school.   We were still dating when I went away to college. My boyfriend lived at home and commuted to a local school in the city. I, like my sisters before me, went away to school, at a private, residential four-year university. This was in the dark ages, meaning before everyone had cell phones.  I had two roommates and we shared a land line in our room.

To keep in touch, my boyfriend and I had set up a calling schedule while I was away.   He called on Friday and Saturday nights at 11:00pm. Think about it. Weekends at 11pm.  This was not good for my social life. Not at all. It suited him, though.   He came home on Friday nights and literally had nothing to do. I was in an awkward position where if I went out with people I’d have to come back alone by 11 for the call.   If I waited until after the call, it would be too late, people were either already out and about or by the time I got off the phone they might be coming home.

I was having a hard time fitting in anyway. I didn’t drink. Most of the freshman nightlife had to do with drinking at Frat Parties and such.  (Frat Parties were so important I still feel the need to capitalize it). But I just wasn’t the Frat Party type. And there was the dating scene, of which I was not a part  because I already had a boyfriend.  And, at this time in the dark ages and at this university, as a woman of color I was kind of invisible to the cute Frat boys.  Plus, I felt I needed to  show my boyfriend I was doing the right thing, or more accurately, not the wrong thing, while I was away.   I didn’t want him to think I was drinking, cheating, changing or even having a good time.   He was lonely.   Most of his friends (including his girlfriend) had gone away to school and he hadn’t. He had gone from big man at High School to being just another commuting student in college.  I knew how miserable he was and I wanted to be there for him. I was also determined to beat the odds and show the world that I could fulfill my academic promise yet still keep my boyfriend and be faithful to the parameters of our relationship.  Yes, co-dependency at it’s finest, ladies and gentlemen. Neither one of us was going to be happy if we clung to each other and our mutual miseries,  limitations and fears.

Happy Wholesome College Students

My  college had a homogeneous population (huge understatement).  The university was not known for being diverse or popular  among  people of color, who were a very small minority there.  And the majority of the majority were from suburban or rural areas, or prep schools and really had  not been exposed to much diversity and did not choose this college in order to be exposed to different types of people.  So many of them had the same backgrounds, ambitions and interests. For folks not in the mainstream,  sometimes the culture shock was an insurmountable obstacle.  Add to that the fact that the school is in the middle of nowhere. There was no town or  city to which to escape from the suffocating sameness.  Consequently, people of color, foreign students, and city kids regardless of socio-economic status would sometimes seek each other out for support.  I, in addition to being African-American, was more of the creative type, and just, well . . .  different. But being a suburban girl, I thought I’d be okay there; I didn’t expect a culture shock at all.  What a silly girl I was,  I did not fully appreciate the level of isolation and cultural homogeneity  I had signed up for.   This place made my vanilla suburb seem like the Rainbow Coalition. My sisters (who attended similar schools) assured me that once I found friends I’d be hanging out in dorms playing cards and listening to music.   At my college, the only people I’d met so far just went out to the Frat houses and drank.   I felt invisible yet at the same time exposed — like I stuck out like a sore thumb  —   not drinking, not dating, not looking like the other kids —  it was a culture shock.

If that wasn’t enough, by the luck of the draw I had been assigned  to  the only female freshman dorm  located  “up hill” on campus. It was  physically removed from the other dorms and the upper class houses which were all “down hill.”   Frat houses and most of the lecture halls were “up hill.” I wasn’t really sure what was “down hill,”  other than the cafeteria. But I was beginning to realize that unless I started to go out  somewhere, I wasn’t going to meet people  outside of my dorm  floor.  Yeah, I was having a hard time fitting in . . . again.

Then I got an invitation, right there  in my mailbox.  It was an invitation to a party at, let’s call it, Walnut Street House, sponsored by the Black Students Association. The House, which was a restored Victorian home turned into a small dorm, was kind of like an International House, except it was  inhabited by upper class  African-American female students, mostly.  But this invitation was for a dance party in the common room there.  Cool.  And it said to dress up!!!   Yay!  Now, I may not have been a drinker back then, but I did love to dance.   And a chance to go somewhere in something other than a turtleneck, sweater and duck boots was enticing.  My musical tastes were classical by day and classic R&B by night, and in a campus full of beer drinking rockers who didn’t dance – unless you count the drunken jumping up and down thing — this sounded like fun.   Maybe I would go, I thought.  Maybe I would go.

But the dance was —- yikes! — on a Saturday night.   How would I be able to explain this to my boyfriend?  I might miss his call!  And I’d been complaining to him about how everything at the school was all about the drinking and  the Frat parties and we were acting so superior  to it all, blah, blah, blah. He never liked me going to any kind of parties.  In fact, in high school he forbade me to go to parties. How could I just tell him I’d found somewhere to go? But I was so lonely. I needed to meet other people.   My initial attempts at going out with the girls on my hall hadn’t  been fun.   Really,  I just hadn’t found my niche yet and it was taking too damn long. I’d started skipping meals to avoid the cafeteria and studying more than probably necessary (I made the Dean’s list, though, . . .  but I digress) .   I was bored, I was starting to need more.   My two roommates were okay, my Hall was okay, but I hadn’t made any good friends and spent too much time alone. Everyone else seemed to be having fun, and my College Self, in a new place, and separated from the boyfriend for the first time, thought life was passing me by.

I decided I would go to the party.   Alone, of course.   Going places alone is a skill I developed too early.  Women are supposed to travel in packs, right?   I hadn’t gotten that memo.  But after all, I was invited, by name, so I could go — alone.  And I was going to go, damnit.  There was only one other black freshman woman in my whole dorm (out of  a couple of hundred girls).  She was probably invited also, but she was not in my half of the dorm and we had never spoken.  Even when I  had passed her in the courtyard and said hello she had averted her eyes.  No judgment, but clearly I would be walking “down hill” alone. I could only hope that once I got there it would be okay.   It was a big chance.

My bigger concern, though, was my boyfriend. How to deal with my boyfriend?  The one who didn’t drink, didn’t dance, didn’t go away to college, didn’t want me to do . . .  any of those things. Hmm.

On the Friday night call I explained to him that I thought I’d go out Saturday, and asked if could he call me later than 11:00. (I know, not the best move on my part.  But I felt I needed to reassure him of my faithfulness and commitment to misery.)    He planned to call me at  midnight.   I’m not gonna lie, this was okay with me, it gave me an out in case the party was horrible or if I felt stupid going alone. And, I figured, the party started at  ten —  two hours would be enough, right?

Well, Saturday night came.  I put on a skirt and sweater and nice shoes.  Told my roommates I had somewhere to go — ha!   I took my “Walk of Shame”  “down hill” to the party alone, passing people walking “up hill” to the frat houses.  They were  dressed for drinking; I was dressed for dancing.  I arrived “down hill”  almost  exactly at 10 o’clock.   Now I ask you, have you ever known a college party to start when it’s supposed to?   Is it ever cool to show up promptly when a party starts?  No, no, no.   Yet there I was, right on time. I walked in and the lights were off — in party mode, somebody was DJ-ing — and yay, it was R&B and Funk, something to dance to. . .  but  no one was there!

I  wandered around in the foyer for a bit, occupied myself by pretending to read bulletin boards, contemplated leaving. Finally, people started to trickle in.  Some dude came out from the back, saw me and left. I saw the “I can’t believe she showed up”  look.    Ha!  But now I couldn’t leave, I’d been seen. Truly, I didn’t care.  I was just happy to be out of my room, and somewhere that didn’t smell of cheap beer.

Once the party actually got started I got lots of attention and dances.   And bonus, everybody was nice!  I met some other freshmen and some upper classmen.   People were wondering why they hadn’t met me before.   Well, I was an “up hill”  girl and these students, at least the girls, lived  “down hill.”  I had no idea.   That night I planted the seeds of some friendships that last to this day.  It was college, so I’m sure some of the people there were drinking, but the drinking was not the focus of the party,  it was the music. I was actually having fun.

But, in horror . . . I looked at the clock,  it was almost midnight!!!!

Crap!   I wasn’t in any deep conversation with anyone, I was just starting to meet people.  In short, I really had no one to say goodbye to.  It’s not like there was a formal host or hostess.

So I just, well . . . left.  As mysteriously as I’d arrived, I left—-

. . . at midnight.

Alone, I ran up the hill in heels to try to get back to my room in time for my scheduled Saturday night phone call from my boyfriend.

I’d missed it. But c’mon, folks,  of course he called back.

It didn’t all change in one night.  I remained separated and aloof and miserable for a while.  But by my sophomore year of college, I’d found people with common interests, and made friends with some of the people I’d met at that dance party, one of whom became my sophomore roommate and a very good friend.   I’d changed my major to my love — music, and met more of my creative brethren there.  I learned to drink (hard liquor, not beer)  and made my own stories in that regard.  Still,  I never became a Frat party regular, except for Reggae night.  Reggae nights were fun, because of the dancing.   I think the last time I went to a regular Frat party some dude pissed on the floor right in front of me, and I was done.   He’s probably a Congressman now . . .  but I digress . . . again.

Later, one of  guys I’d met at that first dance party told me that that was the night the boys started calling me  . . . Cinderella.

Me?  Cinderella?

Well, I had been the mysterious (and yeah, I’ll say it — pretty) girl who showed up alone at a party, danced her behind off, and  ran out at midnight without saying goodbye.

There was no Prince Charming or anything like that.   But there were two evil step sisters —  my roommates.  Alright, so they weren’t actually evil but  since they were having an easier time making friends and fitting in while  I sat in my room and watched  — well, in my fairy tale that qualifies as evil.

What about a wicked step mother?   Well, my boyfriend, of course.   He seemed intent on keeping me in my place, in my own little corner in my own little chair— meaning, in my dorm room on the phone with him  — on the weekends.

As an added postscript, shortly after the party a couple of the guys came knocking on my door to say hello. They weren’t  looking to fit a lost glass slipper, but they were coming to find me . . .  heh heh heh.

However, there was most certainly no Fairy Godmother. Still waiting for her ass to show up.   Humph.

Anyway, it was the closest I’d been to being a fairy tale  princess, if only by accident and circumstance.

Just Me With . . . a Cinderella Story, well kind of . . .