Tag Archives: Dyson

Suck This! Mr. Dyson

James Dyson

I bought a new vacuum cleaner over the weekend.   The heavy-duty big fancy one I’d had at “The Marital Home” never worked as well as I’d liked and it was a mess to empty.  I tried to sell it at a garage sale and ended up just giving it away.  In my down-sizing frenzy for my small home, I bought a little stick , cordless, bag-less number that only worked a short while before dying in a corner, unloved, unused.

I’m embarrassed to say I’ve been sweeping my area rugs.

But I broke down and went to the store to get a vacuum cleaner this weekend because that’s how I roll.  Don’t be jealous, it was one of my more exciting outings lately, but I digress . . .

Once I arrived at the store I felt visually assaulted by the displays of the bright yellow Dyson vacuums.   You know, the state of the art industrially designed  models that cost between $300 and $700.    They are different from other vacuum cleaners because they have that fancy ball thingy — and maybe something new with the motor?  I don’t know, but  I bet they work like a dream.  They should for that amount of money.

I will never buy  a Dyson, however.  And it’s not because of the price (though I could/would not pay that much for a vacuum cleaner at this point in my life).

No, it’s because of the commercial, the first commercial that introduced the product and that  has always just pissed me off.   I’m not going to link it here because it still irks me.  If you know what I’m talking about you’ll know what I’m talking about.

The commercial features James Dyson himself with his gorgeous English accent, which to us Americans automatically makes him smart.  Well, according to the advertisement, Sir Dyson’s wife had asked him to vacuum.   Dutifully, he took out their vacuum cleaner —-  but he didn’t vacuum.  No, he examined the device and decided that it  had serious design flaws.  So instead of vacuuming,  he took their vacuum cleaner apart, analyzed it and eventually designed a prototype for a new vacuum cleaner to which he gave his name — the Dyson.

The rest is history.

Now,  the wife’s perspective.   Though I’m sure she’s reaping the benefits  of the Dyson vacuum cleaner’s wild success,  I think that on that day, in that  moment, she just wanted her husband to vacuum the freaking rug. That’s all.  Just vacuum.  No analysis necessary.  No deconstruction, no prototypes.  Just vacuum the freaking floor!!!!!

Imagine her surprise when she walked into the room and  instead of finding a clean floor she found her husband — on the floor — surrounded by  vacuum cleaner parts, dust and debris.  Anyone who has ever tried to take apart a vacuum cleaner knows that it makes a bloody mess. (Note the English vernacular? Yes?)

All that woman wanted was for her husband to vacuum the carpet. It’s a simple request.  But instead, he likely retired to the garage to begin to build his prototype for the best freaking vacuum cleaner ever invented, because what men and women — and his wife —  had been using for ages was woefully insufficient, malformed, mis-designed, inconvenient and just not up to par.

But for all of his superior, nay, grand design plans which revolutionized  carpet maintenance as we know it, Dyson did not vacuum the freaking floor when his wife asked him to!!!  Instead, he picked that moment to take their vacuum cleaner apart.

And we’re supposed to buy his Rolls Royce of vacuum cleaners?

What a pile of bollocks!

I say to Sir Dyson, I know you are brilliant, but:

Just freaking vacuum the floor.   Then, after you are done,  design your fancy, superior, super-expensive, ball-having, yellow vacuum cleaner.

That’s all  Dame Dyson wanted.  I don’t think she was asking for too much.

Just Me With . . . a Dirt Devil. 

Dirt Devil

Of course Mrs. Dyson can probably afford a golden vacuum cleaner and a maid and butler to do all of  her floors, but it’s the principle of the thing for me.

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